antipodeans:

Paddy Jupurrurla Nelson (Warlpiri people, Australia 1919 – 1999), Paddy Japaljarri Sims (Warlpiri people, Australia 1917 – 2010), Kwentwentjay Jungurrayi Spencer (Warlpiri people, Australia 1919 – 1990), Yanjilypiri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming), 1985. Painting, synthetic polymer paint on canvas.
Yuendumu, Western Desert, Northern Territory, Australia.
Via National Gallery of Australia

antipodeans:

Paddy Jupurrurla Nelson (Warlpiri people, Australia 1919 – 1999), Paddy Japaljarri Sims (Warlpiri people, Australia 1917 – 2010), Kwentwentjay Jungurrayi Spencer (Warlpiri people, Australia 1919 – 1990), Yanjilypiri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming), 1985.

Painting, synthetic polymer paint on canvas.

Yuendumu, Western Desert, Northern Territory, Australia.

Via National Gallery of Australia

antipodeans:

Florence Ada Fuller, Barak, 1885. 
Oil on academy board.
Barak was an important Indigenous artist and activist who worked mostly during the 1880s and 1890s. His paintings and artefacts (spears, shields, clubs and so on) focus on spiritual ceremonies. Culture Victoria has a video discussing Barak’s artistic, cultural and historical significance:

William Barak was a Ngurungaeta for the Wurundjeri people and that means Clan leader. He spent the latter part of his years on Coranderrk Reserve, which was from 1863 to 1903, where he became a prominent figure in the struggle for Aboriginal rights, and particularly the rights of his people on Coranderrk Reserve …
 The Barak artefacts and painting in the Collection are quite significant to us because of who Barak was as a person but also because we don’t have very many items that date back to the late 1800s we can attribute to a specific individual, so for that reason these items are very important to the Trust and very significant to the community.

(via Culture Victoria - Barak)
High-res

antipodeans:

Florence Ada Fuller, Barak, 1885. 

Oil on academy board.

Barak was an important Indigenous artist and activist who worked mostly during the 1880s and 1890s. His paintings and artefacts (spears, shields, clubs and so on) focus on spiritual ceremonies. Culture Victoria has a video discussing Barak’s artistic, cultural and historical significance:

William Barak was a Ngurungaeta for the Wurundjeri people and that means Clan leader. He spent the latter part of his years on Coranderrk Reserve, which was from 1863 to 1903, where he became a prominent figure in the struggle for Aboriginal rights, and particularly the rights of his people on Coranderrk Reserve …

 The Barak artefacts and painting in the Collection are quite significant to us because of who Barak was as a person but also because we don’t have very many items that date back to the late 1800s we can attribute to a specific individual, so for that reason these items are very important to the Trust and very significant to the community.

(via Culture Victoria - Barak)

Image: "National Sorry Day" Sorry in Sign Language by butupa on Flickr.
National Sorry Day commemorates regret for the historical mistreatment of Indigenous Australians. It also symbolises the need for our nation to address the ongoing socio-economic disadvantage of our Indigenous population as a result of colonialism, including these facts:
Indigenous people have a life expectancy that is up to 11.5 lower than the national average
Indigenous people are six times as likely to die through homicide, with 65% of these deaths involving alcohol. This connection between homicide and alcohol rate is three times the national average
Indigenous people are 12 times more likely to be hospitalised for assault, and four times more likely to be hospitalised for alcohol-related mental and behavioural disorders
Indigenous child mortality rates are up to three times higher relative to other kids, and Indigenous children are twice as likely to be admitted to hospital
Indigenous youth are 20 times more likely to be detained in custody
Indigenous students graduate high school at half the rate of other Australians.
Read references and more discussion on my blog. High-res

Image: "National Sorry Day" Sorry in Sign Language by butupa on Flickr.

National Sorry Day commemorates regret for the historical mistreatment of Indigenous Australians. It also symbolises the need for our nation to address the ongoing socio-economic disadvantage of our Indigenous population as a result of colonialism, including these facts:

  • Indigenous people have a life expectancy that is up to 11.5 lower than the national average
  • Indigenous people are six times as likely to die through homicide, with 65% of these deaths involving alcohol. This connection between homicide and alcohol rate is three times the national average
  • Indigenous people are 12 times more likely to be hospitalised for assault, and four times more likely to be hospitalised for alcohol-related mental and behavioural disorders
  • Indigenous child mortality rates are up to three times higher relative to other kids, and Indigenous children are twice as likely to be admitted to hospital
  • Indigenous youth are 20 times more likely to be detained in custody
  • Indigenous students graduate high school at half the rate of other Australians.

Read references and more discussion on my blog.

Aussie Rules footballer and Indigenous Australian, Adam Goodes, unveiled the new Indigenous-themed footy jersey designed by his mother and he fielded questions about yet another incident of racism on the field. He says in response to a media question:

It’s not a comfortable thing to talk about. [Places his palm on chest] It’s definitely not a comfortable thing to have to go through. Yeah it’s going to cause a stir. It’s going to cause people to have conversations about it - but let’s talk about it.

Video source: SBS News.

scienceyoucanlove:

Forty years ago Ruth Bishop discovered the rotavirus, the main cause of gastroenteritis in children. Her pioneering work resulted in the development of two oral vaccines that have been licensed to 100 countries. Thanks to Bishop the number of Australian children with the diseases who were admitted to hospital dropped from 10,000 a year in 2007 to about 2,300.On Monday, Bishop became the first woman to receive the the CSL Florey Medal. Congratulations!Read more: http://bit.ly/16HFBAYImage: Stepping Stone Pictures/Science in Public
source 
High-res

scienceyoucanlove:

Forty years ago Ruth Bishop discovered the rotavirus, the main cause of gastroenteritis in children. Her pioneering work resulted in the development of two oral vaccines that have been licensed to 100 countries. Thanks to Bishop the number of Australian children with the diseases who were admitted to hospital dropped from 10,000 a year in 2007 to about 2,300.

On Monday, Bishop became the first woman to receive the the CSL Florey Medal. Congratulations!

Read more: http://bit.ly/16HFBAY

Image: Stepping Stone Pictures/Science in Public

source 

auspolfornormalpeople:

xarciel:

The repeal of Section 18C arises particularly out of the 2011 prosecution of Andrew Bolt, a columnist for News Limited, publisher of The Australian, for violating the so-called hate-speech laws.

Section 18C states that it is unlawful for a person to “offend offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate another person or a group of people… because of the race, colour or national or ethnic origin.”

A Federal Court judge found he had breached the Racial Discrimination Act because a pair of articles he wrote were not written in good faith and contained factual errors.

And, the judge said, the articles would have offended a reasonable member of the Aboriginal community. [x]

Getting into trouble for racism? Simple, just remove the laws making it illegal. Problem solving: Abbott style.

if you can find any agreement at all with the abbott government position on this matter then you don’t understand racism at all

For further context on how and why racial vilification laws are important in Australia, read my discussion of Indigenous author Anita Heiss, who led a vilification suit against right wing journalist Andrew Bolt. Bolt, a privileged White man, argued some Indigenous leaders were not “Black enough” to be considered Black. What he was actually arguing was that he did not like seeing educated Indigenous leaders gaining attention. Bolt wanted his definition of race to prevail, which conflates skin colour with absolute and continued disadvantage. In Bolt’s vision of social hierarchy, Indigenous people should always be stereotyped and defined by White colonialist ideals.

Heiss’ case also highlights the ongoing plight of Indigenous Australians, who were removed from their communities. Many Indigenous women were forcefully married off to White men and the Government introduced a racial ranking system to qualify Indigenous people from “Quarter Blood” to “Full Blood.” Bolt’s racist assertions reproduce historical patterns of paternalism, where Indigenous people are the property of White people to do with, and classify, as they please (I wrote about this history elsewhere on my on my blog).

Under the new proposed racial vilification laws, people like Bolt can continue their hate speech with impunity, while minority groups are conversely labelled anti-democratic for pointing out discrimination. For exampleAttorney-General George Brandis (pictured top) argued that calling Andrew Bolt racist is an act of racial violence. It isn’t as reverse racism is not a legitimate concept. Yet this type of defence of “bigots” under the guise of “free speech” is soon to be enshrined in law. This change spells a new era of state-led institutional racist violence.

(via sodawound)

antipodeans:

Hosier Lane (pictured) is a central tourist location in Melbourne, as well as a vibrant hub where street artists can represent Melbourne’s diversity and express their political activism. The City of Melbourne is set to consider a proposal to remodel the nearby and equally iconic Forum Theatre, which will effectively reconfigure Hosier Lane as we know it. A new hotel will be built on the back of the Forum, encroaching into Hosier Lane and changing its landscape. The City has stated it supports the refurbishment of The Forum Theatre, but not the extension

Sign this petition to show the City of Melbourne these plans will damage a quintessential artistic outlet for Australia’s established and emerging artists.

Learn more about the fight to save Hosier Lane.

Credits: Art by various Melbourne street artists. Photos by Antipodeans.

2/2 #Sociology of Taiwanese-Australians. Many Taiwanese families have settled into a pattern of being “astronaut workers” who divide their time living here and in Taiwan. They return overseas to tend to their businesses while leaving their families in Australia for months at a time. Other Chinese groups have also used this strategy, but it is not ideal as families spend too much time apart. A better strategy that benefits these families and our society is to create better business and social support for Taiwanese-Australians within Australia. This grows Australia’s economy by making stronger use of their unique business skills, as well as growing our multicultural cohesion.

#visualsociology #taiwan #taiwanaustralians #migrants #multiculturalism #business #socialscience #melbourne #australia #australiansociology  (at Swanston Street Melbourne) High-res

2/2 #Sociology of Taiwanese-Australians. Many Taiwanese families have settled into a pattern of being “astronaut workers” who divide their time living here and in Taiwan. They return overseas to tend to their businesses while leaving their families in Australia for months at a time. Other Chinese groups have also used this strategy, but it is not ideal as families spend too much time apart. A better strategy that benefits these families and our society is to create better business and social support for Taiwanese-Australians within Australia. This grows Australia’s economy by making stronger use of their unique business skills, as well as growing our multicultural cohesion.

#visualsociology #taiwan #taiwanaustralians #migrants #multiculturalism #business #socialscience #melbourne #australia #australiansociology (at Swanston Street Melbourne)

People lining up outside Taiwan Cafe, Swanston Street, Melbourne. 

1/2: Taiwanese-Australians are the second largest Chinese migrant group in Australia. Most of them arrived during the 1980s as highly educated professionals who were relatively well-off overseas. The vast majority arrived under business visas. Researcher David Ip describes them as the “new middle class” who had benefited from Taiwan’s economic growth. Ip’s research shows that once they arrived in Australia, however, many experienced a decrease in social mobility (the ability to move up in socio-economic class). While many owned businesses overseas, they experienced trouble navigating Australia’s legal and business systems due to language barriers. They suffered unemployment and underemployment rates at twice the rate of the national average. They were able to live off their overseas capital and they had higher rates of home ownership compared to other migrants. This alleviates some pressures. Yet research shows that Taiwanese-Australians have been disappointed at the lack of opportunities in Australia. They’ve adapted by splitting their business and family activities between Australia and Taiwan.

#sociology #visualsociology #taiwan #taiwanaustralians #migrants #migrantaustralians #melbourne #australia #chinese #australiansociology High-res

People lining up outside Taiwan Cafe, Swanston Street, Melbourne.

1/2: Taiwanese-Australians are the second largest Chinese migrant group in Australia. Most of them arrived during the 1980s as highly educated professionals who were relatively well-off overseas. The vast majority arrived under business visas. Researcher David Ip describes them as the “new middle class” who had benefited from Taiwan’s economic growth. Ip’s research shows that once they arrived in Australia, however, many experienced a decrease in social mobility (the ability to move up in socio-economic class). While many owned businesses overseas, they experienced trouble navigating Australia’s legal and business systems due to language barriers. They suffered unemployment and underemployment rates at twice the rate of the national average. They were able to live off their overseas capital and they had higher rates of home ownership compared to other migrants. This alleviates some pressures. Yet research shows that Taiwanese-Australians have been disappointed at the lack of opportunities in Australia. They’ve adapted by splitting their business and family activities between Australia and Taiwan.

#sociology #visualsociology #taiwan #taiwanaustralians #migrants #migrantaustralians #melbourne #australia #chinese #australiansociology

Why we shouldn’t excuse “casual” racism: In the video below, an American entertainment reporter has confused Samuel L. Jackson with Laurence Fishburne. Rather than letting him off politely, Jackson riffs on him: “We don’t all look alike! We may be Black and famous, but we don’t all look alike!” The reporter tries to laugh it off but Jackson says, “Hell no!” After speaking about his role on Robocop, the reporter mentions the other cast members. Jackson says: “Make sure you don’t confuse them with those *other* White actors.” 

People explain moments like these away as a “slip of the tongue” on the one hand, or as “unintentional” or “casual racism” on the other hand. There’s no such thing. Racist exchanges, including getting one individual mixed up with another due to their racial appearance, belie the entrenchment of racial hierarchies. This isn’t about Jackson having similar facial traits reminiscent of Fishburne. They look nothing alike. 

White people are not mistaken for other White people simply on the basis of the colour of their skin.

Social decorum often demands that people of colour restrain their responses to racism. I’ve written about this before with respect to Muslim-Australians, who report feeling that they must control their anger when faced with racism so they don’t contribute to the stereotype of the “out of control Muslim.” Even Martin Luther King is supposedly not allowed to look angry about racial oppression. The reporter quips he needs a “spanking” to try to erase the significance of his mistake. Jackson does not simply use humour to mask how offended he feels; he makes it clear that this mix-up is not okay.   

Beneath this reporter’s faux pas lies something deeper. It’s the “you all look alike to me” attitude that perpetuates discrimination and violence against minorities. Jackson is not having any of it. As it should be.

In June 2013, I wrote about Norrie, a transgender woman from New South Wales (pictured above), who had successfully petitioned The New South Wales Court of Appeal to be given the right not to list her gender as either male or female. 
Predictably, this New South Wales decision had been appealed and it went to the High Court. This morning, they ruled that New South Wales law can indeed recognise non-specific genders other than male or female. 
See the legal document below.
High Court ruling: NSW Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages v Norrie
 
Photo and news: SBS News. High-res

In June 2013, I wrote about Norrie, a transgender woman from New South Wales (pictured above), who had successfully petitioned The New South Wales Court of Appeal to be given the right not to list her gender as either male or female. 

Predictably, this New South Wales decision had been appealed and it went to the High Court. This morning, they ruled that New South Wales law can indeed recognise non-specific genders other than male or female. 

See the legal document below.

High Court ruling: NSW Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages v Norrie

 

Photo and news: SBS News.

Since the 1990s Australian law has recognised sexual persecution as grounds for refugee asylum. Still, applicants are forced to go through a protracted process of proving their “gayness.” This excellent video features University of Sydney researcher and activist Senthorun Raj telling the story of Ravi, a Bangladeshi asylum seeker, who was forced not just to establish his sexuality, but to defend his commitment to his queerness. Ravi’s problem was that he was not “visibly” gay in the way the law expected. Yet refuge law on persecution is not simply about looks or physical persecution. Raj writes:

LGBTIQ persecution does not always involve physical violence. Persecution can manifest in persisting psychological abuse, coerced concealment, the inability to subsist, or systemic discrimination that is legitimated/ tolerated by the state. 

In the video, Ravi notes that while his first sexual encounter with a man was consensual it was not pleasurable. This is part of sexuality: we can be attracted to people and not necessarily always enjoy sex equally with everyone. Ravi had also had sex with a woman in the past. This undermined his case as a gay man in the eyes of the Refugee Tribunal. They did not believe that Ravi had “made up his mind” about being gay because of this prior experience.

As Raj points out, sexuality is fluid. Some people can be gay and yet still have had sexual experiences with the opposite gender, or they can gay and not have slept with many people, and you can be gay and not necessarily have enjoyed all your sexual encounters. This works the same for heterosexual people, and yet this somehow doesn’t invalidate their heterosexuality.

This is such an important video to explore the sociology of refugee law and the intersections between migration and queer theory. The story is illustrated wonderfully by Australian artist on Tumblr, Sam Wallman (penerasespaper).