André Kuipers:

1. England, Paris, Belgium, The Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and the Northern Lights over the polar region. 11th February 2012.
2. “Last night”: Nile, Egypt, Israel, Arabian Peninsula, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey. Sunrise in the east. 18th of March 2012.
Via Flickr. Taken from the International Space Station, Expedition 30. 
Credit: ESA/NASA

Photo essay by Fatah Sadaoui for the Collective against Profiling (Collectif contre le contrôle au Faciès), a French not for profit that aims to raise awareness about the ethnic profiling of minority youth in France. The group argues that young people of Middle Eastern and African appearance are routinely harassed by French police. Some of these youths have been stopped by the police up to six times per day and others up to 70 times in one year.

Sources: Stop Le Control Au Facies and Human Rights Watch.

The French army is in Afghanistan at the service of the Afghans against terrorism and against the Taliban. The French army is not in Afghanistan so that Afghan soldiers can shoot at them.

French President Nicholas Sarkozy announced that France is suspending its training and combat mission in Afghanistan after a soldier in the Afghan National Army killed four French soldiers in Taghab valley in the eastern province of Kapisa earlier today. He also said that France is now contemplating an early withdrawal. Check out my Storify of this piece of news! (via thepoliticalnotebook)

French philosopher Jacques Derrida on the fear of writing (from the 2002 documentary Derrida):

…when I don’t write, there is a very strange moment before I go to sleep… all of a sudden I’m terrified by what I’m doing. I tell myself: ‘You’re crazy to write this!’ …what can I compare it to? Imagine a child who does something horrible. Freud talks of childhood dreams where one dreams of being naked and terrified because everyone sees that they’re naked. In any case, in this half sleep I have the impression that I’ve done something criminal, disgraceful, unavowable, that I shouldn’t have done. And somebody is telling me: ‘But you’re mad to have done that’. And this is something I truly believe in my half sleep. And the implied command in this is: ‘Stop everything! Take it back! Burn your papers! What you are doing is inadmissible!’ But once I wake up, it’s over. What this means or how I interpret this is that when I’m awake, conscious, working, in a certain way I am more unconscious than in my half sleep. When I’m in that half sleep there’s a kind of vigilance that tells me the truth. First of all, it tells me that what I’m doing is very serious. But when I’m awake and working this vigilance is actually asleep. It’s not the stronger of the two. And so I do what must be done.

In this clip, Derrida speaks with no-nonsense clarity, self-reflexive insight and honesty. He shows amazing courage to admit to his insecurities as a public intellectual. The doubt that Derrida voices applies to anyone who is honest about the difficulties of writing something original for a public audience: ‘I do what must be done’.

entropyforever:

getyourpokeon:

thefuror:

zikrayat:

farhaaan:

This is Rachid Nekkaz, the French businessman who announced he will pay all fines for women who are charged with wearing the niqab — not just in France but “in whatever country in the world that bans women from doing so”. 
The niqab is a filmy cloth attached to the headscarf that covers all but the eyes. Any woman found to be wearing the niqab in France in public can be fined upto €150 ($200) and ordered to attend ‘re-education classes’. Belgium, Italy, Denmark, Austria, the Netherlands and Switzerland all have — or are planning — similar legislation.
The businessman has already paid fines for women in both France and Belgium where wearing the piece of cloth is outlawed. He said: 

I’m in favour of a law to convict a husband who forces a women to wear the niqab and who forces her to stay at home. But I’m also for a law that lets these women move freely in the streets, because freedom of movement, just like any freedom, is the most fundamental thing in a democracy. 

 He is pictured above with Kenza Drider, the longshot “freedom candidate” for French presidency, after accompanying her to a police tribunal in Paris where she appeared for violating France’s niqab ban. Drider told The Associated Press in an interview: 

When a woman wants to maintain her freedom, she must be bold. I have the ambition today to serve all women who are the object of stigmatization or social, economic or political discrimination. It is important that we show that we are here, we are French citizens and that we, as well, can bring solutions to French citizens.

Nekkaz put up a €2m ($2.5m) property to fund his campaign. 
Photo credit: Getty

Ball so hard motherfuckers wanna fine me

I applaud this man. Forever. This guy knows: if you have money to spare, use it for good things. 

in love

Hope in humanity slightly restored.

entropyforever:

getyourpokeon:

thefuror:

zikrayat:

farhaaan:

This is Rachid Nekkaz, the French businessman who announced he will pay all fines for women who are charged with wearing the niqab — not just in France but “in whatever country in the world that bans women from doing so”. 

The niqab is a filmy cloth attached to the headscarf that covers all but the eyes. Any woman found to be wearing the niqab in France in public can be fined upto €150 ($200) and ordered to attend ‘re-education classes’. Belgium, Italy, Denmark, Austria, the Netherlands and Switzerland all have — or are planning — similar legislation.

The businessman has already paid fines for women in both France and Belgium where wearing the piece of cloth is outlawed. He said

I’m in favour of a law to convict a husband who forces a women to wear the niqab and who forces her to stay at home. But I’m also for a law that lets these women move freely in the streets, because freedom of movement, just like any freedom, is the most fundamental thing in a democracy. 

 He is pictured above with Kenza Drider, the longshot “freedom candidate” for French presidency, after accompanying her to a police tribunal in Paris where she appeared for violating France’s niqab ban. Drider told The Associated Press in an interview

When a woman wants to maintain her freedom, she must be bold. I have the ambition today to serve all women who are the object of stigmatization or social, economic or political discrimination. It is important that we show that we are here, we are French citizens and that we, as well, can bring solutions to French citizens.

Nekkaz put up a €2m ($2.5m) property to fund his campaign. 

Photo credit: Getty

Ball so hard motherfuckers wanna fine me

I applaud this man. Forever. This guy knows: if you have money to spare, use it for good things. 

in love

Hope in humanity slightly restored.

(via 40h4error)