In a perfect world, you could tell a woman she’s hot and she would smile and say thank you because there would be no millennia-long history of women’s bodies being used and abused by men, no notion of women’s beauty as being ‘for’ men, no ridiculous beauty standards. Complimenting a woman on her appearance would be just like complimenting a person on their bike or their shoes or the colour of their hair; it would not carry all the baggage that it carries in this world. But that’s not our world, and it may never be. Yeah, it sucks that women often take it ‘the wrong way’ when you give them unsolicited compliments. You know what sucks more? Yup, patriarchy.” - Brute Reason.


This article made my heart sing. Imposing unsolicited compliments on women and then being angry when she does not respond with enthusiasm is an example of everyday sexism. It’s all about context. As the author points out, complimenting someone you know very well (a friend or family member) and who welcomes such comments is fine. Feeling a need to vocalise your judgement about a woman’s looks on the street, at work or anywhere else is not okay. The idea that women need to be evaluated on their looks, “complimentary” way or otherwise, is a form of sexism. I wrote about this a couple of weeks ago.
Credits 
Source: Gif & quote via Brute Reason. Link via Alurus Ondersan on Pinterest.
[Image: a woman sits at her computer reading. “Nope,” she says at the screen, kicking it. She continues to say “nope” as she boards a spaceship and flies into the sun.] 

In a perfect world, you could tell a woman she’s hot and she would smile and say thank you because there would be no millennia-long history of women’s bodies being used and abused by men, no notion of women’s beauty as being ‘for’ men, no ridiculous beauty standards. Complimenting a woman on her appearance would be just like complimenting a person on their bike or their shoes or the colour of their hair; it would not carry all the baggage that it carries in this world. But that’s not our world, and it may never be. Yeah, it sucks that women often take it ‘the wrong way’ when you give them unsolicited compliments. You know what sucks more? Yup, patriarchy.”
- Brute Reason.

This article made my heart sing. Imposing unsolicited compliments on women and then being angry when she does not respond with enthusiasm is an example of everyday sexism. It’s all about context. As the author points out, complimenting someone you know very well (a friend or family member) and who welcomes such comments is fine. Feeling a need to vocalise your judgement about a woman’s looks on the street, at work or anywhere else is not okay. The idea that women need to be evaluated on their looks, “complimentary” way or otherwise, is a form of sexism. I wrote about this a couple of weeks ago.

Credits

Source: Gif & quote via Brute Reason. Link via Alurus Ondersan on Pinterest.

[Image: a woman sits at her computer reading. “Nope,” she says at the screen, kicking it. She continues to say “nope” as she boards a spaceship and flies into the sun.] 

triciawang:

Well according to this presenter, the dependent variable (delinquency) Is defined by “puppy love”  and “internet addiction”??? And this is why quantitative surveys are fucking problematic!!! I asked the presenter what does “delinquency” mean, she said “deviant behavior.” Then I said what is deviant behavior, she said “activities that don’t conform to social norms.” Then she proceeded to explain the statistical significance of her binomial regressions…..then she said internet addiction is defined by “4” hours of internet use in one day…and so on and so on……..OMG CUT ME #sociology

Agree this is problematic. Is this from an existing scale or the author’s invention? Did they present data? I’m wondering how this scale was validated. I’m also wondering about the researcher’s socio-economic background and how this influences her concept of “delinquency.” High-res

triciawang:

Well according to this presenter, the dependent variable (delinquency) Is defined by “puppy love” and “internet addiction”??? And this is why quantitative surveys are fucking problematic!!! I asked the presenter what does “delinquency” mean, she said “deviant behavior.” Then I said what is deviant behavior, she said “activities that don’t conform to social norms.” Then she proceeded to explain the statistical significance of her binomial regressions…..then she said internet addiction is defined by “4” hours of internet use in one day…and so on and so on……..OMG CUT ME #sociology

Agree this is problematic. Is this from an existing scale or the author’s invention? Did they present data? I’m wondering how this scale was validated. I’m also wondering about the researcher’s socio-economic background and how this influences her concept of “delinquency.”

obstakel:

“On a deeper level, it confirms basic premises of Pathan life: that wealth is not for amassing, but for use and is basically without importance, that only the weak man is attached to property and makes himself dependent on it, that the strong man bases his position on qualities within himself and people’s recognition of these qualities, and not on control of people by the control of objects.”

— Fredrik Barth, Pathan Identity and Its Maintenance

themedicalchronicles:

“Medicine is a social science, and politics is nothing else but medicine on a large scale. Medicine, as a social science, as the science of human beings, has the obligation to point out problems and to attempt their theoretical solution: the politician, the practical anthropologist, must find the means for their actual solution… The physicians are the natural attorneys of the poor, and social problems fall to a large extent within their jurisdiction.”

— Rudolph Virchow

savage-america:

“Part of the blame must lie with the practice of labelling the social sciences as soft, which too readily translates as meaning woolly or soft-headed. Because they deal with systems that are highly complex, adaptive and not rigorously rule-bound, the social sciences are among the most difficult of disciplines, both methodologically and intellectually… As Washington Post columnist Charles Lane wrote in a recent article that called for the NSF not to fund any social science: “The ‘larger’ the social or political issue, the more difficult it is to illuminate definitively through the methods of ‘hard science’.”. In part, this just restates the fact that political science is difficult. To conclude that hard problems are better solved by not studying them is ludicrous. Should we slash the physics budget if the problems of dark-matter and dark-energy are not solved? Lane’s statement falls for the very myth it wants to attack: that political science is ruled, like physics, by precise, unique, universal rules. In any case, we have little idea how successful political science has been — politicians rarely seem to pay much heed to evidence-based advice from the social sciences, unless of course that evidence suits them. And to constrain political scientists with utilitarian bean-counting undermines the free academic nature of the whole exercise.”

A different agenda : Nature

Obstetric fistula is a condition that occurs during a prolonged childbirth where a woman lacks adequate healthcare. It results in tearing of the birth canal which leads to incontinence and results in 90% of babies being stillborn. As a result, women are left unable to control their bodies, leading to bad body odour. These women are often abandoned by their husbands and exiled from their communities for being “unclean.” It affects 2 million women in 55 countries. The condition is mostly preventable when women have access to healthcare and education. In most cases, surgery can repair damage.

UN-Secretary General Ban Ki-moon says: 

Women with obstetric fistula sometimes die in shame abandoned by their families and often suffer lifelong physical and emotional effects — but there is hope. Skilled professionals know how to treat patients. With support, those who have been ostracized can reintegrate into their societies.”

Watch this video narrated by ambassador Natalie Imbruglia to learn more about the condition & how to help.

lookslikelibraryscience:

I’m Tanvi Rastogi, Youth Services Librarian at the Hunterdon County Library in NJ. Armed with a BA in Sociology, I decided to pursue librarianship because I believed in the idea of equal access to info; it wasn’t until after my first library job (as a shelver!) that my like of books evolved into a full-blown love.  Now reading for me is as easy and urgent as breathing and loving.  Every day I hope to share that excitement with kids and their parents.I love all aspects of my job, but one of my favorite parts of each day is that moment of utter quiet just before I flip off the lights in the children’s department, when all the patrons have left for the night and the room is entirely mine.  My library is, as Robert Cormier would have it, truly my treasure house.

lookslikelibraryscience:

I’m Tanvi Rastogi, Youth Services Librarian at the Hunterdon County Library in NJ. Armed with a BA in Sociology, I decided to pursue librarianship because I believed in the idea of equal access to info; it wasn’t until after my first library job (as a shelver!) that my like of books evolved into a full-blown love.  Now reading for me is as easy and urgent as breathing and loving.  Every day I hope to share that excitement with kids and their parents.

I love all aspects of my job, but one of my favorite parts of each day is that moment of utter quiet just before I flip off the lights in the children’s department, when all the patrons have left for the night and the room is entirely mine.  My library is, as Robert Cormier would have it, truly my treasure house.

Discrimination also lies at the heart of many injustices closer to home. The over-incarceration of Aboriginal peoples and widespread violence against women cannot be remedied if we refuse to recognise and respond to anything other than one-off violations of individual freedoms. Anti-discrimination laws are sometimes denounced as “social engineering”… Society is already engineered. Women earn less than men, people with disability are disrespected and disbelieved in criminal proceedings, and job applicants with foreign-sounding names are less likely to get interviews than equally qualified Smiths and McKenzies. If the goal is to rid society of the distorting effects of social engineering, then addressing discrimination is not a hindrance, it’s essential…

Recognition of the importance of non-discrimination is one of the great contributions of the modern international human rights framework. Unlike some of the legal, political and philosophical traditions that preceded it, you don’t have to be white, a man or a landowner to claim human rights protections.

Strip equality from human rights and we’re left with a world where all humans are free, but some humans are more free than others.  

- Rachel Ball, on proposed changes to Australia’s anti-discrimination law, specifically racial vilification in the media. Ball is the director of advocacy and campaigns at the Human Rights Law Centre, Australia. For an example of why racial vilification laws are necessary, read my discussion of Indigenous writer Anita Heiss’ case against media personality and bigot Andrew Bolt. Bolt, a White Australian man, used his media platform to question the authenticity of Indigenous leaders based on the fact that they were not “Black enough.” He did this to both discredit Indigenous leadership, but also to slur Indigenous Australian history of colonial violence, dispossession and removal of children from their communities.

doctorimpostor:

““Like others of my generation, for me a Ph.D. in the social sciences meant that results were only meaningful if full of numbers, chi squares, and cluster diagrams that had a statistical significance of .05. Although there was something very seductive about artfully uncovering elegant patterns in this matter, the relative trust in a scientific method and distrust of the ‘art’ of studying human behaviour never sat well with me. I watched my scientist housemate start an experiment by getting rid of the “noise.” Yet I found that the noise, the outliers that blew away my 0.05 level of confidence, was where some of the most interesting information lay. I felt an almost tangible beauty in the patterns, especially ones that outliers helped foreground; surely they were part of the story””

— Ellen Pader (p. 161) in Dvora Yannow and Peregrine Schwartz-Shea, eds. “Interpretation and Method: Emperical Research Methods and the Interpretive Turn.” Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe. 

gynocraticgrrl:

“At present, women do not have the same access that men do to the pursuit of the profession of science. Women’s child-bearing years are from about age fourteen to age fifty; in our society, the average age for first birth is twenty-five and the average number of children per woman is under two. Thus, procreation and career come into conflict at the time when job mobility and job devotion are paramount in the “typical scientist’s” life cycle. The typical scientist’s academic career begins in kindergarten (for a child of four or five years of age) and runs straight through to a doctorate degree (age twenty-sex or thirty), with post-doctorate research (another five years) and a career path in industry, government or university that proceeds from one level to the next, year by year and job by job. This pattern is planned for men’s and not women’s life cycle. A more egalitarian society would have daycare, co-parenting, continuing education, parental leave, job-sharing, and many of the other changes sought by women who want or need to work outside the home.”

Finn, Geraldine. Voices of Women, Voices of Feminism: Limited Edition. Fernwood Publishing; Halifax. 1993. (pg. 183)

protoslacker:

“The power of anthropology and the social sciences is found, at least for me, in the narratives we put forward about the social conditions of people living in the world. In the social sciences, the books with legs are those that create a connection between writers and a diverse audience of readers. Such a connection is established not through a jargon-laden esoteric language, but through narratives that evoke themes that constitute the human condition.”

Paul Stoller at The Huffington Post. Narrative and the Future of the Social Sciences

futurejournalismproject:

“Narcissism is a developmental stage, not a symptom of the times. Young adults have been condemned as the “Me Generation” since at least the turn of last century. Then they get older, get appalled by youngsters nowadays, and start the condemning themselves.”

Oliver Burkeman, This Column Will Change Your Life: Consistency BiasThe Guardian.

TL;DR: We change too; it’s not just the times, the world, or the others.