jamietheignorantamerican:

Go Forth and Educate Yourselves!

I’d also highly recommend watching the Jane Elliot Brown-eye/Blue-eye experiments, which can be found here:

"Tiger Lily Doesn’t Equal Human Torch" plus a very long rant

thisfeliciaday:

image

The other day I posted this tweet:

"Wait they cast a white chick for Tiger Lily in the new Peter Pan? Did they not remember Lone Ranger last year? Or, you know, racism?"

(If you didn’t hear, Rooney Mara is supposedly playing Tiger Lily, who is a princess of the “Native” tribe, in the reboot.)

I got tons of Tweets agreeing with me, and then a lot of Tweets like this as well:

"I agree they shouldn’t screw around with classic characters. Oh wait they cast a Black Guy as Human Torch."

"Are you actually retarded? Black men were cast to play Heimdall and the Human Torch, why aren’t you complaining about that?"

Well, no sir, I’m not “retarded.” Thanks for asking. But from the general tone of the responses (most were civil, for the record), seems like there are lot people upset about black people replacing white people in the Marvel Universe. And they consider that issue a valid counter-argument to my comment about Tiger Lily’s casting. (I guess because they think both have “changing canon” in common?) 

I’d like to clear up some stuff here, especially with regards to my initial tweet:

I am not upset about Tiger Lily, a role originally written for a Native American female character in the book, being cast as white because it upsets the canon. Screw canon. I am upset about a role that was expressly written as a female minority being given to white actor instead. And here is why. 

Most lead characters and lead actors of movies are white. Period. I even dug up a recent study to back that up, like this is some fucking term paper or something: Across 100 top-grossing films of 2012, only 10.8% of speaking characters were Black, 4.2% were Hispanic, 5% were Asian, and 3.6% were from other (or mixed race) ethnicities. Just over three-quarters of all speaking characters are White (76.3%). 

(In referring to “speaking characters”, I also assume that’s counting judges and store clerks and taxi drivers with just a line or two. You see a lot of casting stick minority characters to check the boxes of “yeah, we had diversity, look!” So we’re not even talking about opportunities to carry the whole movie here.)

Another thing to note from the study: “These trends are relatively stable, as little deviation is observed across the 5-year sample.” Gee, no movement towards reflecting the country or world we live in! Fantastic. 

Bottom line, actors of ethnicity don’t get a lot of work to begin with. And that very fact creates a scarcity in the number of actors of different ethnicities to choose from when casting. It’s a chicken and the egg syndrome. In what instance can you point out a role where a Native American actress has a chance to be a lead in any movie? Almost none. So why chase a dream that doesn’t seem like it could come true, because the system would never allow it? 

It’s a self-perpetuating reality we live with, so the only way to change it is to break the norm, and cast more leading characters with more diversity. At the very least give roles that are intended to be ethnically diverse to ethnically diverse actors, I mean, BARE MINIMUM, PEOPLE. 

So for me, the opportunity to give a leading role that could be a Native American, a possible protagonist role that the audience could relate to and live the story through, to a white actor, is kind of shitty and backwards to me. And that’s why I posted my initial tweet. 

To compare Tiger Lily being cast as a white women to Human Torch or Heimdall being cast as an African-American is not equivalent, because I don’t think this issue is about violating or adhereing to “lore,” I think it’s about providing more representation. And that’s why I think that the Human Torch being cast as African-American is an awesome thing, because that move evolves Hollywood and storytelling and the Marvel universe. 

Remember in the past, lead characters were most likely written as white in the first place, because they were created in an even more white-centric world. Fantastic Four debuted in 1961, segregation was outlawed in 1964. You can’t say that the culture at large at the time didn’t influence the creator’s choices when making these characters! Fast forward fifty years, the culture at large NOW doesn’t match up with the lore from before, and we should be open to changing it. 

Tiger Lily, in the book, is actually portrayed in an EXTREMELY racist way. But hey, it could be a great opportunity to re-invent the character as a Native American to be proud of, rather than dodge the issue entirely, and take the role away and give it to a white woman. 

Why NOT re-imagine Tiger Lily so that the audience can fall in love with and admire a woman of color? Or reimagine a superhero as an African-American, one among a TON of white ones we see every day? Let’s show the audience that they can live through anyone’s eyes! 

We have to make an effort to change the pattern of only seeing stories through white characters’ points of view, so that in the future, diverse protagonists are just a given. So that we can have heroes and villians and judges and love interests of all backgrounds, and not have to point it out as “look how special this is!” Evolving stories and lore is a GOOD THING FOR OUR WORLD. 

And bottom line, if you feel so disenfranchised by one role out of TONS of roles being changed up ethnically, if you are saying you can’t possibly relate to a character who is another race from you, well, I think that’s more a problem of your own than anything else. But don’t worry, the stastics say you’ll have lots of other entertainment for your point of view to choose from. Around 75%, actually. Hooray, I guess? :/

So yeah, I guess that’s my expansion on my previous 140 character Tweet, haha. Happy weekend!

Why we shouldn’t excuse “casual” racism: In the video below, an American entertainment reporter has confused Samuel L. Jackson with Laurence Fishburne. Rather than letting him off politely, Jackson riffs on him: “We don’t all look alike! We may be Black and famous, but we don’t all look alike!” The reporter tries to laugh it off but Jackson says, “Hell no!” After speaking about his role on Robocop, the reporter mentions the other cast members. Jackson says: “Make sure you don’t confuse them with those *other* White actors.” 

People explain moments like these away as a “slip of the tongue” on the one hand, or as “unintentional” or “casual racism” on the other hand. There’s no such thing. Racist exchanges, including getting one individual mixed up with another due to their racial appearance, belie the entrenchment of racial hierarchies. This isn’t about Jackson having similar facial traits reminiscent of Fishburne. They look nothing alike. 

White people are not mistaken for other White people simply on the basis of the colour of their skin.

Social decorum often demands that people of colour restrain their responses to racism. I’ve written about this before with respect to Muslim-Australians, who report feeling that they must control their anger when faced with racism so they don’t contribute to the stereotype of the “out of control Muslim.” Even Martin Luther King is supposedly not allowed to look angry about racial oppression. The reporter quips he needs a “spanking” to try to erase the significance of his mistake. Jackson does not simply use humour to mask how offended he feels; he makes it clear that this mix-up is not okay.   

Beneath this reporter’s faux pas lies something deeper. It’s the “you all look alike to me” attitude that perpetuates discrimination and violence against minorities. Jackson is not having any of it. As it should be.

nerdfaceangst:

myfeelsarehurting:

rjthedetective:

draelogor:

feministsupernatural:

You know what makes me the saddest about Lilo and Stitch?
When she gets kicked out of the dance class, she’s the only person we know for sure is native Hawaiian in her age bracket in the class.
There’s Myrtle, who is white, Elena who is white (f she’s the blonde one), Theresa who’s background is unclear, and Yuki who is implied, based on the name and the large Japanese population in Hawaii, to be Japanese. 
She is taking a dance class of a dance traditional to her people.
And she is kicked out primarily because a white girl, Myrtle, is bullying her. 
How fucking sad is that?

Dude.
This always got me about the movie. I always
wanted
to punch
myrtle
IN THE FACE AND EXISTENCE 

Also, the hula dancing runs in the family, as we find out in the sequel that her mother was a dance champion. It’s clear in this scene that the deaths of her mother and father are still fresh in her mind and I think the dancing reminds her of her mother and happier times. Maybe they practiced together frequently? Idk, it’s just the vibe I get. That Lilo is there to do her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize like the others there.

Her face says it all. Look at how happy she is!

Everyone who liked this, everyone who validated this, you need to unlike it right NOW.
As a Native Hawai’ian, I have a problem with this post.
A fucking big problem.
First off, Hawai’i is massively diverse. Massively. Almost no one is pure Hawai’ian. The speculation that Lilo is at all pure or the only part Hawai’ian is laughable. There’s a very very slim margin that she would be at all. Secondly, just because it’s “not confirmed” doesn’t mean those girls aren’t. There are thousands of Japanese-Hawai’ian girls. Thousands, and thousands more of even more mixed races who are Hawai’ian. My sister is a shade away from blonde, and as pale as snow white, and she is just as half-Hawai’ian as I am - even though I look more “authentic”. I know many beautiful Hawai’ian girls with clouds of red hair and creamy complexions from mixed bloodlines. If you want to get “authentic” and go off of Lilo’s appearance, to us locals, she looks half-Asian. She looks definitely hapa at best.
It angers me beyond all reason that this has reposts, reposts from people who don’t understand the Native Hawai’ian culture, much less the culture that sprung from it which envelops our islands. You are reposting blind ignorance. Who are you to decide who looks more Hawai’ian? Who are you people to assume our culture and that this girl takes it more seriously than the others? Because she gets a backstory?
The amazing thing about my culture, MY culture, is that hula opens its arms to all. All children here are welcome to it. It is passed on to them and their blood does not dictate their passion nor their eligibility. “Lilo is there to make her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize”. Do you have any idea what a halau is? You don’t, no, none of you do. You have no idea what a halau is. A halau is your family, a halau are your friends, your only social circle when you are fully dedicated. My mother IS one of the queens of hula who trained under Maiki Aiu and she still talks to her hula sisters daily. They were part of her life. It isn’t enough to just hula, or learn it, and put blinders on the sides of your head. If you don’t live it with your hula sisters and brothers, then your story is nothing. You go through motions and you tell no stories.
Don’t try for one moment, to make that scene out like it was Lilo being bullied by a white girl. Yes, Hawai’i is still being raped by the ideologies of white appropriation, but do not for one moment think that these girls may not be Hawai’ian. Do not think for one moment that you have the right nor the knowledge to sweep onto the internet and start reposting like a fucking idiot about a culture and mixed bloodlines and races you don’t really understand aside from “the white man hurt them”. You damage people like my sister, like my cousins, all equally as proud and maka’a’inana as I, simply because they don’t look like me.
You have no right to use this scene as commentary, because you have not even a shade of an idea of the damage you do with it.

nerdfaceangst:

myfeelsarehurting:

rjthedetective:

draelogor:

feministsupernatural:

You know what makes me the saddest about Lilo and Stitch?

When she gets kicked out of the dance class, she’s the only person we know for sure is native Hawaiian in her age bracket in the class.

There’s Myrtle, who is white, Elena who is white (f she’s the blonde one), Theresa who’s background is unclear, and Yuki who is implied, based on the name and the large Japanese population in Hawaii, to be Japanese. 

She is taking a dance class of a dance traditional to her people.

And she is kicked out primarily because a white girl, Myrtle, is bullying her. 

How fucking sad is that?

Dude.

This always got me about the movie. I always

wanted

to punch

myrtle

IN THE FACE AND EXISTENCE 

Also, the hula dancing runs in the family, as we find out in the sequel that her mother was a dance champion. It’s clear in this scene that the deaths of her mother and father are still fresh in her mind and I think the dancing reminds her of her mother and happier times. Maybe they practiced together frequently? Idk, it’s just the vibe I get. That Lilo is there to do her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize like the others there.

Her face says it all. Look at how happy she is!

Everyone who liked this, everyone who validated this, you need to unlike it right NOW.

As a Native Hawai’ian, I have a problem with this post.

A fucking big problem.

First off, Hawai’i is massively diverse. Massively. Almost no one is pure Hawai’ian. The speculation that Lilo is at all pure or the only part Hawai’ian is laughable. There’s a very very slim margin that she would be at all. Secondly, just because it’s “not confirmed” doesn’t mean those girls aren’t. There are thousands of Japanese-Hawai’ian girls. Thousands, and thousands more of even more mixed races who are Hawai’ian. My sister is a shade away from blonde, and as pale as snow white, and she is just as half-Hawai’ian as I am - even though I look more “authentic”. I know many beautiful Hawai’ian girls with clouds of red hair and creamy complexions from mixed bloodlines. If you want to get “authentic” and go off of Lilo’s appearance, to us locals, she looks half-Asian. She looks definitely hapa at best.

It angers me beyond all reason that this has reposts, reposts from people who don’t understand the Native Hawai’ian culture, much less the culture that sprung from it which envelops our islands. You are reposting blind ignorance. Who are you to decide who looks more Hawai’ian? Who are you people to assume our culture and that this girl takes it more seriously than the others? Because she gets a backstory?

The amazing thing about my culture, MY culture, is that hula opens its arms to all. All children here are welcome to it. It is passed on to them and their blood does not dictate their passion nor their eligibility. “Lilo is there to make her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize”. Do you have any idea what a halau is? You don’t, no, none of you do. You have no idea what a halau is. A halau is your family, a halau are your friends, your only social circle when you are fully dedicated. My mother IS one of the queens of hula who trained under Maiki Aiu and she still talks to her hula sisters daily. They were part of her life. It isn’t enough to just hula, or learn it, and put blinders on the sides of your head. If you don’t live it with your hula sisters and brothers, then your story is nothing. You go through motions and you tell no stories.

Don’t try for one moment, to make that scene out like it was Lilo being bullied by a white girl. Yes, Hawai’i is still being raped by the ideologies of white appropriation, but do not for one moment think that these girls may not be Hawai’ian. Do not think for one moment that you have the right nor the knowledge to sweep onto the internet and start reposting like a fucking idiot about a culture and mixed bloodlines and races you don’t really understand aside from “the white man hurt them”. You damage people like my sister, like my cousins, all equally as proud and maka’a’inana as I, simply because they don’t look like me.

You have no right to use this scene as commentary, because you have not even a shade of an idea of the damage you do with it.

(via nothingman)

crackerhell:

gbg-g:

thewhitemankilledthetruth:

almondskeyes:

almondskeyes:

“White Teachers VS ‘Innercity’ Students: Deception in Media Portrayal”

So I spent many hours making this video for an education class……

Basically, I analyzed several “white savior teacher movies” and gave some insight on what this does for audiences

I made this last night and it’s kinda long but I think it’s important you know?

bless this post

This is a whole lotta truth. I’m just gonna add, another detrimental aspect of this narrative is that it affects how teachers and prospective teachers view themselves in a classroom. The public school teaching force is overwhelmingly made out of middle class white people, primarily white women, when the student body is nothing of the sort, so the narrative ends up being played out by teachers who think it could really work this way, and when they fail, b/c this shit is structural, it leads to a lot of blaming of the students. I’m just gonna drop links to a book here 

http://readabookson.tumblr.com/post/31681971350

The book is Black Students, Middle Class Teachers and he spends a couple chapters talking about this gap between the teacher’s world and the students. Though he does lean a bit heavy on the religion for me.

wow these movies are actually worse than i thought

This is a really great video. The analysis fits in with the Magical Negro trope (which I’ve described here). This term describes how Hollywood films tend to cast minorities in supporting roles that aggrandise the White protagonist as the saviour of minorities. 

(via marvelous-merbutler)

flanneryogonner:

Found from various places online:

The Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire

Angela Y. Davis - Are Prisons Obsolete?

Angela Y. Davis - Race, Women, and Class

The Communist Manifesto - Marx and Engels

Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches by Audre Lorde

Three Guineas by Virginia Woolf

Critical Race Theory: An Introduction by Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic

The Black Image in the White Mind: Media and Race in America- Robert M. Entman and Andrew Rojecki

Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism - bell hooks

Feminism is for Everybody - bell hooks

outlaw culture - bell hooks

Faces at the Bottom of the Well - Derrick Bell

Sex, Power, and Consent - Anastasia Powell

I am Your Sister - Audre Lorde

Patricia Hill Collins - Black Feminist Thought

Gender Trouble - Judith Butler

Four books by Frantz Fanon

Their Eyes Were Watching God - Zora Neale Hurston

Medical Apartheid - Harriet Washington

Fear of a Queer Planet: Queer Politics and Social Theory  - edited by Michael Warner

Colonialism/Postcolonialism - Ania Loomba

Discipline and Punish - Michel Foucault

The Gloria Anzaldua Reader

Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? by Mark Fisher

This Bridge Called by Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color by Cherríe Moraga & Gloria Anzaldúa

What is Cultural Studies? - John Storey 

Cultural Theory and Popular Culture - John Storey 

The Disability Studies Reader 

Michel Foucault - Interviews and Other Writings 

Michel Foucault - The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1Vol. 2Vol. 3 

Michel Foucault - The Archeology of Knowledge 

This blog also has a lot more. 

(Sorry they aren’t organized very well.)

(via marvelous-merbutler)

diasporadash:

Dual Ethnicity and Depressive Symptoms: Implications of Being Black and Latino in the United States

This study investigated the expression of depressive symptoms in adolescents who are of Afro-Latino descent. Levels of expression of depressive symptoms were compared for four groups of adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 residing in the United States: European Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Afro-Latinos. One hypothesis is that Afro-Latinos should exhibit higher levels of depressive symptoms than either African Americans or Latinos by virtue of being double minorities. An alternative hypothesis is that Afro-Latino youth will show lower levels of depressive symptomology because of their access to a broader repertoire of cultural resources when faced with stress and depression-inducing events. Results indicated that Afro-Latino females tended to exhibit higher levels of depressive symptoms than those of the other ethnic groups. Across all ethnic groups, adolescent females tended to show higher levels of depressive symptoms than adolescent males and older adolescents tended to show higher levels of depression than younger adolescents. 

(via afro-dominicano)

modernmonkeys:

Watch!: And when you started out, there were almost no Asian-Americans on TV. Now you’re Watson. The TV my Asian-American daughter grows up watching will be very different than what I grew up watching.
Lucy: It is significant, and I think we still have a long way to go. It is good that you’ll have to explain to her that when Daddy was a teenager, there wasn’t anybody like her on television. People say I’m a pioneer, but I don’t recognize it because I’m still living it. Maybe on my last breath if they name a street after me in the city, I’ll say, “Wow, I made a difference.” Right now, it doesn’t feel like it. [x]

Lucy Liu in the October 2013 edition of Watch! Magazine

(via zuleykaaaa)

gradientlair:

Carefully notice the lack of logical thinking here. She’s not even following the line of questioning.

When privilege is in question, no matter how ignorant or intelligent a person is, they tend to retreat to illogical arguments that are easily refuted and they kinda resemble toddlers, except I actually like toddlers and toddlers make more sense.

And honestly, many White women would not tolerate such ridiculous arguments, lack of empathy and self-centeredness ("why bring up race if it’s not a problem for you?") if the question was gender and a White man posed this foolishness to them. They wouldn’t tolerate it. They would easily expose the ignorance. But magically when privilege (in this case White privilege) is in question, all bets are off.

The last GIF explains my life in so many ways… *rolls eyes*

The weirdest thing is that though this is from a satirical show (The Daily Show) and meant to discuss racism with humor, these are the real answers that most Whites give daily, so I couldn’t really laugh this time. I just felt tired.

The invisible knapsack strikes again. Peggy McIntosh used this concept to unpack how as a woman and feminist she was used to fighting male privilege. As an educator she later came to realise that as a white woman she had privileges and white men even more due to gender and race.

(via onecuriousb)

sterlingsea:

howtobeterrell:

sapphrikah:

mytwisteddaceyluv:

dapper-dan-hale:

mrskidderkat:

crookedglasses:

negressive:

youngblackandvegan:

diaryofabaglady:

fuckthesliceiwantthepie:

thatlupa:

"faux pixie crop" "clever"
CACKLING

White ppl try so hard

Jordan was right. These white trying to figure out how to make this happen. I’M DYING

lmao white folk so lost



White people better not steal this shit neevuh! 

FAUX PIXIE CUT? Listen…

Holy shit it’s a hair style yet people are really making it about race do they have nothing better to do or

To those of you (I’m talking you, my white brothers and sisters) who don’t get why this is so funny to nonwhites, you obviously don’t understand black culture. Ri-Ri’s (that’s short for Rhianna) hair wrap, the “faux pixie cut” as some of you are now calling it, is equivalent to a white woman leaving the house in freaking hair rollers and black folks calling it a “faux curly bob” and deciding to trend it and wear it out to the clubs as a fashion statement. Here’s a short history lesson (never say I didn’t teach you anything). Since the early 1960s, AA women have been wrapping their hair this way with hairpins and covering it with a scarf before going to bed at night to keep it neat and smooth. It is not…I repeat…not a hairstyle to wear in public unless you just don’t give a fuck. If ya’ll don’t believe me go ask the one black friend you know, if you happen to have one. I ain’t talking about your one mix black friend who’s as lost as you are. I mean your real one who grew up in a house with a black mama who relaxed her hair and used a straightening comb. Being a WoC, Ri-Ri obviously knew this and didn’t bother to unwrap her hair because she doesn’t give a fuck about the AMAs and wasn’t about to waste a hairstyle on it. Yet, some fool wrote an article about how cute and clever her non-hairstyle looked.  This shit is as funny to us as when white folks were making a huge fuss over Miley Cyrus’ so called ‘twerking’ and even had the nerve to put that shit in the dictionary. THE FUCKING DICTIONARY, SERIOUSLY? Sometimes, PoC can’t help but laugh and shake our heads at this nonsense.

YO, THIS EXPLANATION IS EVERYTHING.
WHITE PEOPLE PLEASE READ.
This was yet another of Rihanna’s not-give-a-fuck moments, perhaps even a fuck-you-you’re-not-important gesture towards the AMAs and the public.



Could give a shit about the award show, but when I saw her hair I was just so happy. Happy and amused that non-black people would have no idea what it was or what it meant. lul.
High-res

sterlingsea:

howtobeterrell:

sapphrikah:

mytwisteddaceyluv:

dapper-dan-hale:

mrskidderkat:

crookedglasses:

negressive:

youngblackandvegan:

diaryofabaglady:

fuckthesliceiwantthepie:

thatlupa:

"faux pixie crop" "clever"

CACKLING

White ppl try so hard

Jordan was right. These white trying to figure out how to make this happen. I’M DYING

lmao white folk so lost

White people better not steal this shit neevuh! 

FAUX PIXIE CUT? Listen…

Holy shit it’s a hair style yet people are really making it about race do they have nothing better to do or

To those of you (I’m talking you, my white brothers and sisters) who don’t get why this is so funny to nonwhites, you obviously don’t understand black culture. Ri-Ri’s (that’s short for Rhianna) hair wrap, the “faux pixie cut” as some of you are now calling it, is equivalent to a white woman leaving the house in freaking hair rollers and black folks calling it a “faux curly bob” and deciding to trend it and wear it out to the clubs as a fashion statement. Here’s a short history lesson (never say I didn’t teach you anything). Since the early 1960s, AA women have been wrapping their hair this way with hairpins and covering it with a scarf before going to bed at night to keep it neat and smooth. It is not…I repeat…not a hairstyle to wear in public unless you just don’t give a fuck. If ya’ll don’t believe me go ask the one black friend you know, if you happen to have one. I ain’t talking about your one mix black friend who’s as lost as you are. I mean your real one who grew up in a house with a black mama who relaxed her hair and used a straightening comb. Being a WoC, Ri-Ri obviously knew this and didn’t bother to unwrap her hair because she doesn’t give a fuck about the AMAs and wasn’t about to waste a hairstyle on it. Yet, some fool wrote an article about how cute and clever her non-hairstyle looked.  This shit is as funny to us as when white folks were making a huge fuss over Miley Cyrus’ so called ‘twerking’ and even had the nerve to put that shit in the dictionary. THE FUCKING DICTIONARY, SERIOUSLY? Sometimes, PoC can’t help but laugh and shake our heads at this nonsense.

YO, THIS EXPLANATION IS EVERYTHING.

WHITE PEOPLE PLEASE READ.

This was yet another of Rihanna’s not-give-a-fuck moments, perhaps even a fuck-you-you’re-not-important gesture towards the AMAs and the public.

image

Could give a shit about the award show, but when I saw her hair I was just so happy. Happy and amused that non-black people would have no idea what it was or what it meant. lul.

(via onecuriousb)