likeafieldmouse:

Joseba Eskubi

This Spanish artist describes his art:

I’m interested in organic forms in decomposition, soft and amorphous qualities that accentuate the tactile sense of vision. There is movement and tension, an internal force that pulls things toward the abyss. 
I usually work at several works at the same time, with the intention of expanding the possibilities of each theme. I try to make the final effect as something obsessive, repetitive, with a certain tone and atmosphere. The idea is that each image has a temperature, a character like a portrait of an unknown thing until you create it. 
High-res

likeafieldmouse:

Joseba Eskubi

This Spanish artist describes his art:

I’m interested in organic forms in decomposition, soft and amorphous qualities that accentuate the tactile sense of vision. There is movement and tension, an internal force that pulls things toward the abyss. 

I usually work at several works at the same time, with the intention of expanding the possibilities of each theme. I try to make the final effect as something obsessive, repetitive, with a certain tone and atmosphere. The idea is that each image has a temperature, a character like a portrait of an unknown thing until you create it. 

This video by Eddie G provides an engaging Mexican-American introduction to El Día de los Muertos/ Day of the Dead. Eddie G captures how one community celebrates the dead, as just one step in the “pyramid of life.” In describing the symbolism of the colours of a symbolic altar, one woman says:

[In Spanish] The yellow is the beginning of life. The red is the momentum of the blood. Green represents settling down, starting a family, working, and helping the community. Blue represents the sky. The elders reminiscing and talking about their memories. That’s all we have left. The top is white. That’s death. 

The Day of the Dead has grown in popularity in the United States and in other places outside Mexico. Non-Mexicans may be attracted to the colourful costumes, the skulls, face-painting and the “cool” allure of death. Yet the significance of this spiritual festival is more than just about death. It is a symbol of post-colonial struggles and a celebration of life. 

Education researchers Dafina Lazarus Stewart and Adele Lozano see that the Day of the Dead is an important tradition that can help introduce students to intercultural experiences. In particular, it is an opportunity to learn about Mexican culture and draw connections between cultures of resistance amongst various other Latin American traditions, as well as a way to better understand the links between various Latin youth social movements around the world. The researchers write:

The concept of resistance is an important cultural/ political aspect of Día de los Muertos. Although the Latina/o population consists of diverse groups, most share a history of colonialism and oppression. It is commonly believed that Indigenous populations in Mexico refused to back down when the Spanish colonisers tried to force them to relinquish their annual Día de los Muertos ritual (Brandes, 1998). Many Latina/o college students are aware of this spirit of resistance and may draw parallels to their own struggles to pursue higher education in the face of institutional racism, financial hardships, and marginalisation within the academy. Día de los Muertos can serve to empower students as they recognize the importance of resistance, connect with their spiritual selves, and reaffirm the value of their cultural traditions…

The researchers note that to an outsider, the Day of the Dead seems to hold a morbid fascination with death and the occult. In fact, this festival actually draws on symbols of duality and profound spirituality, both of which are central to Mexican culture: “death is viewed as a continuation of life through the open acknowledgement of the reality of a spiritual, nonmaterial existence.”

Learn more:

See my other Latin posts on Tumblr and my sociology of Latin politics and culture on Pinterest.

Credits:

Video: Oh Em Gee, It’s Eddie G

#Paella at the #Hispanic Street Festival, Johnson Street, #Melbourne #Australia. The #food is by #Spanish Gourmet Caterers. #Latin


Rebekah Del Rio - Llorando by ivailasofia

Rebekah Del Rio - Llorando.

Chavela Vargas. La Llorona.

From the soundtrack to Frida, starring Salma Hayek, and featuring heart breaking scenes from the film, including Vargas singing the song to Hayek. Vargas reportedly had a love affair with the real Frida Kahlo when she was young. Anti-establishment and publicly identifying as homosexual, Vargas took a bold stance against the status quo of the music industry. Vargas defied stereotypes of what women singers should look and sound, by sculpting her unique vocal talents around traits typically associated with masculinity. Known as the rough voice of tenderness (“la voz áspera de la ternura”), Vargas embodied art both as passion and protest.  

Vargas died on the 5th of August 2012, RIP.

Image via Van Guardia.

Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) Day 1: [REC]³ Génesis.
Spanish film with English subtitles. Screens with the impressive, low-budget short Australian zombie flick Perished.
Like most adoring fans of the [REC] franchise, I came to this film brimming with excitement. REC³ Genesis (the third REC film) is the first of 15 films I’m watching at the MIFF. Unfortunately, this third instalment is disappointing - primarily because of it does not live up to the [REC] legacy.
Taught and inventive, the first [REC] film was released in 2007, delivering effective horror and using the shaky cam mockumentary style to full effect. Written and directed by Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza and their other writing collaborator, Luiso (Luis) Berdejo, [REC] introduced horror fans to a strong new female protagonist.  Ángela Vidal  (played by Manuela Velasco) is a reporter who accompanies a fireman crew to an apartment building, her every move chronicled by her faithful cameraman. The audience soon learns that the apartment complex is home to an ever-increasing number of tenants who are infected with a mysterious virus that turns them into quick-limbered zombies. Velasco delivers a great performance that compelled the audience to care for her character as she screamed, ran, fought and crawled through the chaos and in the darkness. 
The second film, [REC²], opens immediately where the first film leaves off, with a SWAT Team storming the apartment building seeking to restore order and to figure out what transpired. We view the unfolding mayhem through the SWAT members’ helmet cams. The team is accompanied by a gravely serious priest who is motivated to stay in the building even as the body count rises, intent on seeking out the source of the zombie infestation. 
These two [REC] films invigorated the zombie genre by blending supernatural and religious themes with a brilliant and frightening twist. Having established a relatively complex mythology explaining the zombie plague, fans flock to the latest film with assurance that this legend will take more thrilling and unexpected turns. Instead, we get a comedic and notably pedestrian fare.
I feel conflicted about REC Genesis. If you’ve not seen the other two films, nor the competent American remakes, Quarantine and Quarantine 2: Terminal (also penned and helmed by the original Spanish writer-directors), then REC Genesis stands as an above average and enjoyable zombie romp. For fans of the first two REC films, it seems inevitable that you will be left wanting.
The two leads in REC Genesis make an amiable pair to watch. Clara (played by Leticia Dolera) and Koldo (Diego Martín) are newlyweds whose wedding reception becomes the scene of a massacre as one of the guests carries the zombie infection, having crossed paths with one of the unfortunate tenants from the first film. Apart from this tenuous connection, Genesis does little to extend the story that evolved over the other REC films. There is more religious injection into this plot, but it lacks the provocative and terrifying lick of the previous films.
The audience will still barrack for the survival of the young lovers in REC Genesis. The bride is played with beguiling gusto by Dolera, proving once again that these Spanish film-makers cast strong female leads without overly sexualising them. Nevertheless, the bride in Genesis incredulously chainsaws only one side of her wedding dress so her garter shows while she continues to run in ridiculously high heels throughout the latter part of the film. Such an ill conceived heterosexual male fantasy that women would want to, or be able to maintain, such ridiculous fashion choices during the zombie apocalypse! (It’s a real thing, jeepers!)
REC Genesis provides genuine laughs at times, but it is unconcerned with scaring its committed audience. Comedic zombie films have an established history, with horror master George Romero re-styling his Night of the Living Dead series as a horror comedy in the 1980s. The excessive gore in REC Genesis is played as slapstick. The narrative ambles along in entertaining but predictable grooves. Overall, the tone of this film lacks the punch of the previous REC movies, which unfurled as a clever, elongated fear feast.
On the one hand, it is commendable that the REC writing-directing-producing team of three set out to reinvent and push their original story further into new territory, rather than playing it safe and delivering derivative thrills. On the other hand, in this particular case, the comedic horror style was a miscalculation for their established audience. The first two REC films stand together as a blistering example of the majesty of the horror genre. When horror films are conceived with passion for intelligent audiences, they deliver solid characters and stories of morality and human endurance through unexpected frights that delight. REC Genesis does not meet this promise, nor does it stand up to the calibre of its predecessors. Neither thrilling nor inventive, it doesn’t move its audience’s imagination nor does it inspire us to ponder and debate the macabre.
Rating: Credit - 6.5 out of 10 Zombie Bites. A cut above the other zombie flicks plaguing our screens, but mediocre when held up to the first two trailblazing RECs.
It screens at the MIFF again this Friday, should you bother going along?
"Short answer, ‘Yes’ with an ‘If,’ long answer: ‘No’ with a ‘But’." If you haven’t seen the other RECs and you feel like a laugh, by all means go forth and zombie. Otherwise, I recommend you go instead to V/H/S (which I’ll be reviewing next) or any of the other horror films screening at the MIFF, such as the Australian film 100 Bloody Acres, which looks ace. Can’t wait to see it in general release.  High-res

Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) Day 1: [REC]³ Génesis.

Spanish film with English subtitles. Screens with the impressive, low-budget short Australian zombie flick Perished.

Like most adoring fans of the [REC] franchise, I came to this film brimming with excitement. REC³ Genesis (the third REC film) is the first of 15 films I’m watching at the MIFF. Unfortunately, this third instalment is disappointing - primarily because of it does not live up to the [REC] legacy.

Taught and inventive, the first [REC] film was released in 2007, delivering effective horror and using the shaky cam mockumentary style to full effect. Written and directed by Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza and their other writing collaborator, Luiso (Luis) Berdejo, [REC] introduced horror fans to a strong new female protagonist.  Ángela Vidal  (played by Manuela Velasco) is a reporter who accompanies a fireman crew to an apartment building, her every move chronicled by her faithful cameraman. The audience soon learns that the apartment complex is home to an ever-increasing number of tenants who are infected with a mysterious virus that turns them into quick-limbered zombies. Velasco delivers a great performance that compelled the audience to care for her character as she screamed, ran, fought and crawled through the chaos and in the darkness. 

The second film, [REC²], opens immediately where the first film leaves off, with a SWAT Team storming the apartment building seeking to restore order and to figure out what transpired. We view the unfolding mayhem through the SWAT members’ helmet cams. The team is accompanied by a gravely serious priest who is motivated to stay in the building even as the body count rises, intent on seeking out the source of the zombie infestation. 

These two [REC] films invigorated the zombie genre by blending supernatural and religious themes with a brilliant and frightening twist. Having established a relatively complex mythology explaining the zombie plague, fans flock to the latest film with assurance that this legend will take more thrilling and unexpected turns. Instead, we get a comedic and notably pedestrian fare.

I feel conflicted about REC Genesis. If you’ve not seen the other two films, nor the competent American remakes, Quarantine and Quarantine 2: Terminal (also penned and helmed by the original Spanish writer-directors), then REC Genesis stands as an above average and enjoyable zombie romp. For fans of the first two REC films, it seems inevitable that you will be left wanting.

The two leads in REC Genesis make an amiable pair to watch. Clara (played by Leticia Dolera) and Koldo (Diego Martín) are newlyweds whose wedding reception becomes the scene of a massacre as one of the guests carries the zombie infection, having crossed paths with one of the unfortunate tenants from the first film. Apart from this tenuous connection, Genesis does little to extend the story that evolved over the other REC films. There is more religious injection into this plot, but it lacks the provocative and terrifying lick of the previous films.

The audience will still barrack for the survival of the young lovers in REC Genesis. The bride is played with beguiling gusto by Dolera, proving once again that these Spanish film-makers cast strong female leads without overly sexualising them. Nevertheless, the bride in Genesis incredulously chainsaws only one side of her wedding dress so her garter shows while she continues to run in ridiculously high heels throughout the latter part of the film. Such an ill conceived heterosexual male fantasy that women would want to, or be able to maintain, such ridiculous fashion choices during the zombie apocalypse! (It’s a real thing, jeepers!)

REC Genesis provides genuine laughs at times, but it is unconcerned with scaring its committed audience. Comedic zombie films have an established history, with horror master George Romero re-styling his Night of the Living Dead series as a horror comedy in the 1980s. The excessive gore in REC Genesis is played as slapstick. The narrative ambles along in entertaining but predictable grooves. Overall, the tone of this film lacks the punch of the previous REC movies, which unfurled as a clever, elongated fear feast.

On the one hand, it is commendable that the REC writing-directing-producing team of three set out to reinvent and push their original story further into new territory, rather than playing it safe and delivering derivative thrills. On the other hand, in this particular case, the comedic horror style was a miscalculation for their established audience. The first two REC films stand together as a blistering example of the majesty of the horror genre. When horror films are conceived with passion for intelligent audiences, they deliver solid characters and stories of morality and human endurance through unexpected frights that delight. REC Genesis does not meet this promise, nor does it stand up to the calibre of its predecessors. Neither thrilling nor inventive, it doesn’t move its audience’s imagination nor does it inspire us to ponder and debate the macabre.

Rating: Credit - 6.5 out of 10 Zombie Bites. A cut above the other zombie flicks plaguing our screens, but mediocre when held up to the first two trailblazing RECs.

It screens at the MIFF again this Friday, should you bother going along?

"Short answer, ‘Yes’ with an ‘If,’ long answer: ‘No’ with a ‘But’." If you haven’t seen the other RECs and you feel like a laugh, by all means go forth and zombie. Otherwise, I recommend you go instead to V/H/S (which I’ll be reviewing next) or any of the other horror films screening at the MIFF, such as the Australian film 100 Bloody Acres, which looks ace. Can’t wait to see it in general release. 

peroquevaina:

dreaminginspanish:

thecsph:

phaflacina:

schoolmeetlife:

Loving the new posters! It’s long overdue to have a campaign that speaks of the importance of using two types of contraceptives to both prevent pregnancy and protect against STIs. The pill does not protect against herpes, but barrier methods, like condoms, do. The condom is not as reliable as an IUD to prevent pregnancy.

nychealth:

Here’s our latest educational campaign to prevent STDs and pregnancy aimed at South Bronx teens. The campaign is part of the city’s efforts to ensure that all teens have the information, skills and resources to make healthy decisions about their sexual and reproductive health.

This is great.

Being protected from pregnancy is NOT the same thing as being protected from STIs! Always important to make sure that even if you are on another type of birth control, you should back it up with condoms unless you are sure that your partner tests clean. 

The same applies to post-menopausal people, or those who have had hysterectomies!

Love this!!!

<3

(via pamalamela)



El movimiento de los &#8220;indignados&#8221; ha llamado a una protesta mundial hoy para conmemorar su primer aniversario, en la que espera concentrar a cientos de miles de personas en diversas ciudades de Europa y de Estados Unidos. Una democracia real, más justicia social, una distribución de la riqueza y una ética pública forman parte común de las demandas de todos los actos que hoy sábado celebra ese movimiento.


The &#8220;Outraged&#8221; movement has called for a global protest to mark its first anniversary. Protesters hope to rally hundreds of thousands of supporters in various cities in Europe and the United States. A true democratic movement, it calls for social justice, re-distribution of wealth and public ethics.
The rest of the story covers events in various countries such as Greece, Spain, Portugal, the UK and the USA.
Read the story in Spanish at La Opinión.

El movimiento de los “indignados” ha llamado a una protesta mundial hoy para conmemorar su primer aniversario, en la que espera concentrar a cientos de miles de personas en diversas ciudades de Europa y de Estados Unidos. Una democracia real, más justicia social, una distribución de la riqueza y una ética pública forman parte común de las demandas de todos los actos que hoy sábado celebra ese movimiento.

The “Outraged” movement has called for a global protest to mark its first anniversary. Protesters hope to rally hundreds of thousands of supporters in various cities in Europe and the United States. A true democratic movement, it calls for social justice, re-distribution of wealth and public ethics.

The rest of the story covers events in various countries such as Greece, Spain, Portugal, the UK and the USA.

Read the story in Spanish at La Opinión.

My latest journal article: Context and outcomes of intercultural education amongst international students in Australia. Published by Intercultural Education:

International students represent a large economic and international relations investment for Australia. Australian universities are increasingly relying upon overseas students for their revenue, but these institutions are not adequately addressing the special learning, linguistic, cultural and religious needs of these students. Despite their Australian education, international students experience various difficulties in finding work in their field of study after they graduate. Poor English-language, communication and problem-solving skills are the biggest obstacles to securing ongoing and satisfying jobs. Employer biases regarding international students are equally a problem. This paper provides a demographic context of the international student population in Australia and it also addresses the gaps impeding their full social participation in Australian educational institutions. This paper argues that a stronger focus on the socialisation of international students is likely to increase their educational and career satisfaction. Educational providers would better serve international students by focusing on practical learning, career-planning and reinforcing the social and cultural skills valued by Australian employers.

Spanish abstract:

Los estudiantes internacionales representan una gran inversión económica así como de relaciones internacionales para Australia. Las universidades Australianas dependen financieramente cada vez mas del ingreso de estudiantes de ultramar, sin embargo no responden adecuadamente a las necesidades culturales, lingüísticas y religiosas de estos estudiantes. No obstante su formación universitaria, los estudiantes internacionales encuentran barreras para la obtención de empleo en su campo profesional luego de su graduación en universidades australianas. Este artículo presenta el contexto demográfico general de la población estudiantil internacional en Australia e identifica las barreras para su integración social. El argumento central en el presente artículo es que una mayor atención a la organización social de estos estudiantes puede no solamente mejorar su satisfacción educacional sino también profesional. Las instituciones educativas Australianas podrían ofrecer mejores servicios a los estudiantes internacionales si avocaran recursos para el entrenamiento de habilidades prácticas que ayudaran a estos estudiantes a planear su carrera y mejorar sus capacidades sociales y culturales.

Read my article via the publisher.

anthropologica:

Zygmunt Bauman (1925-), Polonia/Inglaterra

Nacido en  Poznań, Polonia, 19 de noviembre de 1925
Pensando sociológicamente
La hermenéutica y las ciencias sociales
La cultura como praxis
Modernidad y ambivalencia
Trabajo, consumismo y nuevos pobres
Modernidad líquida
La sociedad individualizada
Ética posmoderna
etc.

Para hacerse fan de Bauman en Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ZygmuntBauman
Antropología de la A a la Z.

anthropologica:

Zygmunt Bauman (1925-), Polonia/Inglaterra

Nacido en  Poznań, Polonia, 19 de noviembre de 1925

  • Pensando sociológicamente
  • La hermenéutica y las ciencias sociales
  • La cultura como praxis
  • Modernidad y ambivalencia
  • Trabajo, consumismo y nuevos pobres
  • Modernidad líquida
  • La sociedad individualizada
  • Ética posmoderna
  • etc.

Antropología de la A a la Z.

Carlos Vives. Fruta Fresca. Beautiful song, always makes me happy. Super hot lyrics.

Ese beso de tu boca
Que me sabe a fruta fresca
Que se escapo de tus labios
Y se metio en mi cabeza
Ese beso con que sueño
Cuando las penas me acechan
Que me lleva al mismo cielo
Y a la tierra me regresa
Que reza, reza, que reza
Y aunque ya no tengas duda
Que el recuerdo de sus besos
Me lleve hasta la locura