everydayhybridity:

One of my students turned in a paper earlier this week and provided the first photo above as an addition. It shows the area in Admiralty where the protesting students have set up a study area. It is here that people are catching up with their classes and writing up coursework.

For those who are not in Hong Kong, the protests have been remarkable not because of the political atmosphere, but because of the reclamation of the city and of public space.

The really radical thing about the last few weeks has been the co-operative ethos instilled and enacted by the students. In reclaiming a part of the city they have also introduced a new measure of civility in the city. People are enjoying walking around their city and actually talking and communicating with each other. Strangers are helping one another and working for collective goals. Despite being a `safe city, Hong Kong is so ordered by other forces (think of Sassen’s global business elite) that people have little say in the city. In recent years Hong Kong people have felt the city slip away from them. There is a real rich argument here from the closure of Queen’s Pier in Central in 2007 and its eventual demolition in 2008, to the reclamation of land for the Central Wanchai Bypass. With reference to the new road, a good chunk of Victoria Park has now been removed. There are too many other examples that also cut right into issues of public and social division. Little ownership of the city has resulted in a mass occupation and a renaissance of city decorum. 

Democracy itself is an ambiguous goal. This however is a participatory democracy, an engaged public forum. Something that even democratic countries have trouble in pursuing, cultivating, or supporting. If people actually have a say in their lives, what remarkable things they can achieve.

These new spaces of civic engagement are also full of emotional ties. The fact that they will soon be gone is saddening to many, but there is such pride and joy that they have existed.

The other picture I include comes from a colleague who posted the photo and the comment on Facebook. I’ve kept her anonymous, but she posts a great point. It just goes to show what the city can really be like when people co-operate and share. This is after all ‘our’ city.

In this video, I discuss the careers panel that I sat on as part of the annual conference for The Australian Sociological Association (TASA). I focus on the panel discussion about how to translate theory into practice when you’re working outside academia. I also cover workplace ethics in the video, as well issues about managing professional identity outside of academia and the importance of networking. I was asked about how I manage my research consultancy business. I talk about how to market yourself and how to establish a professional reputation with prospective clients using social media.

Read a summary of the video on Sociology at Work.

In her Honours study of the gendered patterns in a school of music, sociologist Amy Loudin found that, when listening to music, male musicians were more likely to focus on technical issues. Yet when listening to pieces conducted by a woman, they were more likely to judge it based on their perception of her mood, and in so doing, they commented on her violation of gender norms. They said things like, “Well, she’s pissed about something” and “That was really aggressive.” Women’s gender was the focus of their interpretation and critique. One musician says: “I don’t want to say this in a bad way, but she’s a woman.”
The women focused on memory when interpreting music, evoking examples of remembering other experiences: “It reminded me of what would be playing in the opening credits of an old movie,” and “It reminds me of ‘Night on the Bald Mountain.’” Loudin also found that women were under-represented amongst faculty members and as clinicians, conductors and composers. The women who entered the highly masculine fields, such as percussion, felt like they were given feminine instruments, like the bells. Overall, women’s contribution was under-valued, however, they were featured in recital advertising in a sexualised way. 
This is an absolutely wonderful example visual sociology! Made in collaboration with artist Courtney Leonard. 
Image via Behance. High-res

In her Honours study of the gendered patterns in a school of music, sociologist Amy Loudin found that, when listening to music, male musicians were more likely to focus on technical issues. Yet when listening to pieces conducted by a woman, they were more likely to judge it based on their perception of her mood, and in so doing, they commented on her violation of gender norms. They said things like, “Well, she’s pissed about something” and “That was really aggressive.” Women’s gender was the focus of their interpretation and critique. One musician says: “I don’t want to say this in a bad way, but she’s a woman.”

The women focused on memory when interpreting music, evoking examples of remembering other experiences: “It reminded me of what would be playing in the opening credits of an old movie,” and “It reminds me of ‘Night on the Bald Mountain.’” Loudin also found that women were under-represented amongst faculty members and as clinicians, conductors and composers. The women who entered the highly masculine fields, such as percussion, felt like they were given feminine instruments, like the bells. Overall, women’s contribution was under-valued, however, they were featured in recital advertising in a sexualised way. 

This is an absolutely wonderful example visual sociology! Made in collaboration with artist Courtney Leonard. 

Image via Behance.

Allie Stone - Collections Assistant and Imaging Specialist in Insects, holding a cotton woven tunic from Guatemala, an item from the Economic Botany Collections. Jim Boone - Collections Manager, Insects, holding two paradise birdwing butterflies. Constance Van Beek - Preparator, Fossil Invertebrates, holding the bronze cast replica of Sue’s tooth, one of a dozen especially made for the preparators who worked on her. Laura Briscoe - Collections/Research Assistant, Botany, holding a piece of lace knit from Agave americana fibers from the Azores. Kevin H. - Collections Assistant, Botany, holding an original Schuster botanical illustration. Robert Lücking - Collections Manager and Adjunct Curator, Botany, holding a plastic sign covered with lichens collected in a rain forest in Costa Rica. Matthew Lavoie - Collections Assistant, Botany, holding the model of a cane toad from the imaging lab.

thebrainscoop:

My friend Daniel - photographer, biologist, artist, friendliest person ever - is working on a photo project that highlights staff and volunteers of The Field Museum along with their favorite collections items.

Posing with artifacts and specimens brings a certain ingenuity to the object; perhaps it would otherwise be something easily overlooked in a drawer, its history buried in comparative numbers. Singling out individual articles stresses their inherent uniqueness, and we’re drawn in with a curiosity trying to puzzle out why, out of 27 million items in this museum, these particular people chose the specimens in their hands.

There’s a visceral connection between Laura’s gaze and that agave lace: she’s looking at it so lovingly and holding it so carefully, as if she’s imagining herself sitting in awe at the foot of the person who painstakingly knit the fibers together and watching the entire process come together. Having seen her knit her own scarves on our way home one evening I can fathom the respect she has for not only the collections but also the people responsible for their creation and care.

Throughout Daniel’s portraits he’s been able to capture so well a humbling sense of gratification and pride, a mood that reflects our joy of being here because of the love we have for this world and its achievements. We’re all bursting with the same sense of wonder. 

Check out more portraits in his series, including questions answered by the featured scientists.


Ask the powerful five questions:
What power have you got?
Where did you get it from?
In whose interest do you exercise it?
To whom are you accountable?
How can we get rid of you?
Only democracy gives us that right. That is why no one with power likes democracy and that is why every generation must struggle to win it and keep it; including you and me, here and now. 
Tony Benn 2005.

Via: Phil BC.
[Image Tony Benn and quote as above] High-res

Ask the powerful five questions:

What power have you got?

Where did you get it from?

In whose interest do you exercise it?

To whom are you accountable?

How can we get rid of you?

Only democracy gives us that right. That is why no one with power likes democracy and that is why every generation must struggle to win it and keep it; including you and me, here and now. 

Tony Benn 2005.

Via: Phil BC.

[Image Tony Benn and quote as above]

Since the 1990s Australian law has recognised sexual persecution as grounds for refugee asylum. Still, applicants are forced to go through a protracted process of proving their “gayness.” This excellent video features University of Sydney researcher and activist Senthorun Raj telling the story of Ravi, a Bangladeshi asylum seeker, who was forced not just to establish his sexuality, but to defend his commitment to his queerness. Ravi’s problem was that he was not “visibly” gay in the way the law expected. Yet refuge law on persecution is not simply about looks or physical persecution. Raj writes:

LGBTIQ persecution does not always involve physical violence. Persecution can manifest in persisting psychological abuse, coerced concealment, the inability to subsist, or systemic discrimination that is legitimated/ tolerated by the state. 

In the video, Ravi notes that while his first sexual encounter with a man was consensual it was not pleasurable. This is part of sexuality: we can be attracted to people and not necessarily always enjoy sex equally with everyone. Ravi had also had sex with a woman in the past. This undermined his case as a gay man in the eyes of the Refugee Tribunal. They did not believe that Ravi had “made up his mind” about being gay because of this prior experience.

As Raj points out, sexuality is fluid. Some people can be gay and yet still have had sexual experiences with the opposite gender, or they can gay and not have slept with many people, and you can be gay and not necessarily have enjoyed all your sexual encounters. This works the same for heterosexual people, and yet this somehow doesn’t invalidate their heterosexuality.

This is such an important video to explore the sociology of refugee law and the intersections between migration and queer theory. The story is illustrated wonderfully by Australian artist on Tumblr, Sam Wallman (penerasespaper).

Representing Ourselves:

This film tells how women from different countries are working together on visual projects to create support the development of a multicultural network in a rural area of England.

Women from the Cumbria Multicultural Women’s Network have come together as Alien Films and are active participants in Visible Voice. 

On our latest blog post, I discuss managing ethics in the workplace. Within academia, you can’t conduct research without ethics approval from your university. Outside of academia, some research organisations will have ethics protocols in place, but most workplaces are unlikely to stipulate ethics in the way we see it in sociology. Ethics is more than just doing what we think is right. Sociological ethics is about following the consensus of our discipline.This includes:  a code of professional integrity; guidelines for how to carry out, use and communicate our findings; protocols for how to manage relationships with research participants, clients, stakeholders and funding organisations; and our rights and obligations to all living beings, resources and the communities involved in and impacted by our work. Read more on how to manage ethics in the workplace over on our blog. High-res

On our latest blog post, I discuss managing ethics in the workplace. Within academia, you can’t conduct research without ethics approval from your university. Outside of academia, some research organisations will have ethics protocols in place, but most workplaces are unlikely to stipulate ethics in the way we see it in sociology. Ethics is more than just doing what we think is right. Sociological ethics is about following the consensus of our discipline.This includes:  a code of professional integrity; guidelines for how to carry out, use and communicate our findings; protocols for how to manage relationships with research participants, clients, stakeholders and funding organisations; and our rights and obligations to all living beings, resources and the communities involved in and impacted by our work. Read more on how to manage ethics in the workplace over on our blog.

deerstalkerpictures:

We recently shot an interview with PhD Candidate Meg for The University of New South Wales in which she discusses her PhD research subject. Meg is a sociologist whose research consists of visually analysing kawaii subcultures to unpack the meaning behind them, and determine how they relate to power and gender. We will share the video with you when it’s uploaded!

(via sociolab)

instagram.com/p/g3DYXHlHZ-/#jethromullen instagram.com/p/g0QHF7Aw8o/#dguttenfelder instagram.com/p/g1jyECnc1-/#jeffcanoy instagram.com/p/g1yIXcFHQH/#jethromullen instagram.com/p/gtzdcACDW3/#ivancnn instagram.com/p/gx0qAMAw7f/#dguttenfelder instagram.com/p/gx4eMok0yj/#djstaana instagram.com/p/gy8_8juRH4/#omsitoy instagram.com/p/gzUaleFHTz/#jethromullen

instagram:

Surviving the Storm: Documenting the Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on Instagram

Want to help the victims of Typhoon Haiyan? Visit the International Red Cross and Red Crescent to learn how you can help.

Typhoon Haiyan, one of the largest tropical storms ever recorded, made landfall in central Philippines on 7 November, resulting in an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. An estimated 4 million people have fled their homes—a figure that outnumbers the displaced populations of Hurricane Katrina and the Indian Ocean tsunami combined.

Thousands of emergency shelters have been set up, and international relief agencies are working around the clock to provide aid, but parts of the Philippines are still lacking basic supplies, medicine or clean water and food.

Photojournalists, reporters and residents have been documenting the relief efforts on Instagram, capturing the resilience of the Filipino people and the massive job ahead for the survivors and countless volunteers.

See more images by following journalists @jeffcanoy, @dguttenfelder, @jethromullen and @ivancnn.

This photoset shows the untapped potential of using Instagram for visual sociology. Visual sociology refers to sociologists taking photos, or creating other visuals to represent sociological phenomena. It also incorporates photos and visuals that sociologists ask their participants to take as part of their methodology.

These photos are not visual sociology because they have not been taken by sociologists, but they show the importance of documenting significant events as well as everyday life in a visual format.

These photos show a diversity of experience, with ordinary people reproducing their world from their own point of view. Rather than having events selectively documented by journalists, or simply described by the words of outsiders, photos taken by locals open up a new avenue of perception that would otherwise be less accessible without the use of social media.

Follow the #Haiyan hashtag on Instagram and you’ll see various posts documenting the plight of survivors, the devastation and clean up over those who died, and the various efforts to provide shelter, necessities and to rebuild. You’ll see people expressing gratitude over the distribution of humanitarian aid from Government, aid agencies, groups, individuals and international donations such as this school from Washington; volunteers showing their work; and photos of people coping with the disaster in various ways, including young people playing sports

Visual sociology receives minor attention within our discipline. Having researchers use a visual methodology is a powerful way of illustrating the sociological imagination. More on this soon. In the meantime, you can follow my #VisualSociology series using that hashtag on Instagram. 

Bedouin warrior by Cultural Collections, University of Newcastle on Flickr.

This photograph is from an album created by Lt Thomas Gerald George Fahey who served in the Australian Light Horse in the Middle East during World War 1.

The Bedouin are comprised of various Arabic tribes who were forced into a precarious nomadic lifestyle in the late 19th Century under Ottoman rule. Some Bedouin tribes fought alongside the Turks during the First World War. During the early 1960s, severe drought forced many Bedouin away from a herding lifestyle, and most now live in large cities such as Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Tunisia, Libya, Saudi Arabia and Syria. 
 

Bedouin warrior by Cultural Collections, University of Newcastle on Flickr.

This photograph is from an album created by Lt Thomas Gerald George Fahey who served in the Australian Light Horse in the Middle East during World War 1.

The Bedouin are comprised of various Arabic tribes who were forced into a precarious nomadic lifestyle in the late 19th Century under Ottoman rule. Some Bedouin tribes fought alongside the Turks during the First World War. During the early 1960s, severe drought forced many Bedouin away from a herding lifestyle, and most now live in large cities such as Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Tunisia, Libya, Saudi Arabia and Syria. 

 

Short video explaining Bourdieu’s Field Theory.  Uses football/soccer as a way to illustrate the concepts of habitus and doxa. Basic production but lovely example of visual sociology.