gynocraticgrrl:

“At present, women do not have the same access that men do to the pursuit of the profession of science. Women’s child-bearing years are from about age fourteen to age fifty; in our society, the average age for first birth is twenty-five and the average number of children per woman is under two. Thus, procreation and career come into conflict at the time when job mobility and job devotion are paramount in the “typical scientist’s” life cycle. The typical scientist’s academic career begins in kindergarten (for a child of four or five years of age) and runs straight through to a doctorate degree (age twenty-sex or thirty), with post-doctorate research (another five years) and a career path in industry, government or university that proceeds from one level to the next, year by year and job by job. This pattern is planned for men’s and not women’s life cycle. A more egalitarian society would have daycare, co-parenting, continuing education, parental leave, job-sharing, and many of the other changes sought by women who want or need to work outside the home.”

Finn, Geraldine. Voices of Women, Voices of Feminism: Limited Edition. Fernwood Publishing; Halifax. 1993. (pg. 183)

Childs_13 by azherhameed on Flickr."Children study in a yard with scrap collected for recycling, in Hyderabad, India, Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. Twenty years after the U.N. adopted a treaty guaranteeing children’s rights, 1 billion children are still deprived of food, shelter or clean water, and nearly 200 million are chronically malnourished, UNICEF said Thursday. Some of the worst abuses play out every day on the dusty streets of India, where government and aid groups’ efforts to help children are overwhelmed by the staggering poverty and the dislocation of millions of rural villagers who flood the cities in search of jobs. (AP Photo/ Mahesh Kumar A.)" High-res

Childs_13 by azherhameed on Flickr.

"Children study in a yard with scrap collected for recycling, in Hyderabad, India, Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. Twenty years after the U.N. adopted a treaty guaranteeing children’s rights, 1 billion children are still deprived of food, shelter or clean water, and nearly 200 million are chronically malnourished, UNICEF said Thursday. Some of the worst abuses play out every day on the dusty streets of India, where government and aid groups’ efforts to help children are overwhelmed by the staggering poverty and the dislocation of millions of rural villagers who flood the cities in search of jobs. (AP Photo/ Mahesh Kumar A.)"

gradientlair:

Carefully notice the lack of logical thinking here. She’s not even following the line of questioning.

When privilege is in question, no matter how ignorant or intelligent a person is, they tend to retreat to illogical arguments that are easily refuted and they kinda resemble toddlers, except I actually like toddlers and toddlers make more sense.

And honestly, many White women would not tolerate such ridiculous arguments, lack of empathy and self-centeredness ("why bring up race if it’s not a problem for you?") if the question was gender and a White man posed this foolishness to them. They wouldn’t tolerate it. They would easily expose the ignorance. But magically when privilege (in this case White privilege) is in question, all bets are off.

The last GIF explains my life in so many ways… *rolls eyes*

The weirdest thing is that though this is from a satirical show (The Daily Show) and meant to discuss racism with humor, these are the real answers that most Whites give daily, so I couldn’t really laugh this time. I just felt tired.

The invisible knapsack strikes again. Peggy McIntosh used this concept to unpack how as a woman and feminist she was used to fighting male privilege. As an educator she later came to realise that as a white woman she had privileges and white men even more due to gender and race.

(via onecuriousb)

On our latest blog post, I discuss managing ethics in the workplace. Within academia, you can’t conduct research without ethics approval from your university. Outside of academia, some research organisations will have ethics protocols in place, but most workplaces are unlikely to stipulate ethics in the way we see it in sociology. Ethics is more than just doing what we think is right. Sociological ethics is about following the consensus of our discipline.This includes:  a code of professional integrity; guidelines for how to carry out, use and communicate our findings; protocols for how to manage relationships with research participants, clients, stakeholders and funding organisations; and our rights and obligations to all living beings, resources and the communities involved in and impacted by our work. Read more on how to manage ethics in the workplace over on our blog: SociologyAtWork.org #sociology #visualsociology #socialscience #research #ethics #work #appliedresearch #science High-res

On our latest blog post, I discuss managing ethics in the workplace. Within academia, you can’t conduct research without ethics approval from your university. Outside of academia, some research organisations will have ethics protocols in place, but most workplaces are unlikely to stipulate ethics in the way we see it in sociology. Ethics is more than just doing what we think is right. Sociological ethics is about following the consensus of our discipline.This includes:  a code of professional integrity; guidelines for how to carry out, use and communicate our findings; protocols for how to manage relationships with research participants, clients, stakeholders and funding organisations; and our rights and obligations to all living beings, resources and the communities involved in and impacted by our work. Read more on how to manage ethics in the workplace over on our blog: SociologyAtWork.org #sociology #visualsociology #socialscience #research #ethics #work #appliedresearch #science

everydayhybridity:

A short but powerful video by Gratiane de Moustier about the recruitment and employment of Indonesian foreign domestic workers in Hong Kong.

A collection of the pictures from the project are also available here at the Hong Wrong blog.

Putting the finishing touches on our latest Sociology at Work video! It’s partly focused on the benefits of doing an internship as part of your degree. Here’s a portion of what I posted on our Instagram earlier this week: If you get this opportunity to do an internship you should jump at the chance. Most community and industry placements will mean you will get to work as a research assistant on a project. You may put together literature reviews; carry out surveys; do statistical analyses; or you might participate in ethnographies. Or you’ll do community engagement. This could mean visiting local service centres to assist in education or leisure programs; you might help compile resources for training packages; or you might assist with rehabilitation or case management. You’ll likely have to write a report on your research experiences for your university as well as your placement. All of this looks great on a resume but even better you’ll have real research and workplace examples that you can draw on for your next job interview. 


Read more on our Insta @sociologyatwork 

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get the latest updates: YouTube.com/SociologyAtWork


#sociology #internship #students #communitywork #work #socialscience #visualsociology #research #appliedresearch #careers High-res

Putting the finishing touches on our latest Sociology at Work video! It’s partly focused on the benefits of doing an internship as part of your degree. Here’s a portion of what I posted on our Instagram earlier this week: If you get this opportunity to do an internship you should jump at the chance. Most community and industry placements will mean you will get to work as a research assistant on a project. You may put together literature reviews; carry out surveys; do statistical analyses; or you might participate in ethnographies. Or you’ll do community engagement. This could mean visiting local service centres to assist in education or leisure programs; you might help compile resources for training packages; or you might assist with rehabilitation or case management. You’ll likely have to write a report on your research experiences for your university as well as your placement. All of this looks great on a resume but even better you’ll have real research and workplace examples that you can draw on for your next job interview.


Read more on our Insta @sociologyatwork

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get the latest updates: YouTube.com/SociologyAtWork


#sociology #internship #students #communitywork #work #socialscience #visualsociology #research #appliedresearch #careers

saltysojourn:

Immigrants as a Percentage of the Total US Population and of the US Civilian Labor Force, 1970 to 2011 Notes: The term “foreign born” (or “immigrants”) refers to people residing in the United States who were not US citizens at birth. The foreign-born population includes naturalized citizens, legal permanent residents, certain legal non-immigrants (e.g., refugees and persons on student or work visas), and persons illegally residing in the United States. The civilian labor force includes all civilians age 16 and older who were classified as employed or unemployed during the reference week of the survey or census. Sources: The 2010 and 2011 data are from the 2010 and 2011 American Community Survey accessed via the American FactFinder. The 1970 to 2000 data are from the Decennial Censuses and were downloaded from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS). Steven Ruggles, Matthew Sobek, Trent Alexander, Catherine A. Fitch, Ronald Goeken, Patricia Kelly Hall, Miriam King, and Chad Ronnander.Ê Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 3.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Population Center [producer and distributor], 2008.) High-res

saltysojourn:

Immigrants as a Percentage of the Total US Population and of the US Civilian Labor Force, 1970 to 2011

Notes: The term “foreign born” (or “immigrants”) refers to people residing in the United States who were not US citizens at birth. The foreign-born population includes naturalized citizens, legal permanent residents, certain legal non-immigrants (e.g., refugees and persons on student or work visas), and persons illegally residing in the United States. The civilian labor force includes all civilians age 16 and older who were classified as employed or unemployed during the reference week of the survey or census.

Sources: The 2010 and 2011 data are from the 2010 and 2011 American Community Survey accessed via the American FactFinder. The 1970 to 2000 data are from the Decennial Censuses and were downloaded from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS). Steven Ruggles, Matthew Sobek, Trent Alexander, Catherine A. Fitch, Ronald Goeken, Patricia Kelly Hall, Miriam King, and Chad Ronnander.Ê Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 3.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Population Center [producer and distributor], 2008.)

#Sociology of #Work: #Research by Australian Sociologist Barbara Pocock shows how #management can improve work/life balance. This includes being flexible with hours and the structure of #work, the type of work different employees do, and the ways that employees can deliver work outputs. With new #technology, there are a range of cloud based solutions for collaboration and submission of work. Another important way of managing work/life balance is to foster an environment of #trust where employees can let you know about their out-of-hours responsibilities and preferences should they wish to have you better accommodate their needs. Managers should also seek to support working  #parents and #workers who provide care for dependants who are sick, elderly or disabled. This includes access to affordable childcare, good parental and care leave arrangements that won’t impact on career progression, and giving employees the capacity to take holidays and other time off to manage family and health appointments. Society talks about work/ life balance as an issue that individuals and families should negotiate on their own. Pocock puts emphasis on “Supportive workplace cultures, practices and #leadership” as the means to improve work. Making work/ life balance a responsibility of workplaces as well as employees is a pivotal way that managers & CEOs can ensure that work is fulfilling, meaningful and energising, rather than a drain on the #creativity and #productivity of their #company. Pocock’s latest research is found in “Time Bomb: Work, Rest and Play in Australia Today.” #socialscience #worklifebalance #business #management #humanresources #corporate #training #life #career #visualsociology High-res

#Sociology of #Work: #Research by Australian Sociologist Barbara Pocock shows how #management can improve work/life balance. This includes being flexible with hours and the structure of #work, the type of work different employees do, and the ways that employees can deliver work outputs. With new #technology, there are a range of cloud based solutions for collaboration and submission of work. Another important way of managing work/life balance is to foster an environment of #trust where employees can let you know about their out-of-hours responsibilities and preferences should they wish to have you better accommodate their needs. Managers should also seek to support working #parents and #workers who provide care for dependants who are sick, elderly or disabled. This includes access to affordable childcare, good parental and care leave arrangements that won’t impact on career progression, and giving employees the capacity to take holidays and other time off to manage family and health appointments. Society talks about work/ life balance as an issue that individuals and families should negotiate on their own. Pocock puts emphasis on “Supportive workplace cultures, practices and #leadership” as the means to improve work. Making work/ life balance a responsibility of workplaces as well as employees is a pivotal way that managers & CEOs can ensure that work is fulfilling, meaningful and energising, rather than a drain on the #creativity and #productivity of their #company. Pocock’s latest research is found in “Time Bomb: Work, Rest and Play in Australia Today.” #socialscience #worklifebalance #business #management #humanresources #corporate #training #life #career #visualsociology

Earlier today I spoke on a careers panel at the #postgraduate day for The Australian Sociological Association. I’ll do a full post on this later but for now I wanted to share a couple of the questions we were asked. These ranged from specifics like how to set up a business to broader questions about how to manage #ethics and how to maintain a professional identity. One of the key themes from the panellists was learning to translate #theory into practice and networking. I spoke about writing for your future clients via a specialist blog and using #SocialMedia. #sociology #visualsociology #career #work #students #monashuniversity High-res

Earlier today I spoke on a careers panel at the #postgraduate day for The Australian Sociological Association. I’ll do a full post on this later but for now I wanted to share a couple of the questions we were asked. These ranged from specifics like how to set up a business to broader questions about how to manage #ethics and how to maintain a professional identity. One of the key themes from the panellists was learning to translate #theory into practice and networking. I spoke about writing for your future clients via a specialist blog and using #SocialMedia. #sociology #visualsociology #career #work #students #monashuniversity

#Sociology of #community: A group who follow a social structure within a society (culture, norms, values, status). They may work together to organise social life within a particular place,  
or they may be bound by a sense of belonging sustained across time and space. We start students thinking about community using the work of Ferdinand Toennies. He used the concept of gemienschaft to study the close social ties in rural and pre-industrial societies, where everyone knows one another and bonds overlap. For example your local grocerer is also your neighbour, you socialise together and you may be their children’s teacher. Gesellschaft is the opposite. Toennies used this to describe urban, post-industrial communities where people don’t necessarily know their neighbours and locals have specialised roles. You may not know your grocerer by name or associate outside their shop. Toennies sees the former as an ideal community and the latter as a problem. Durkheim and other sociologists have argued against the idealism of this typology as close-knit communities are more likely to adhere to traditions that demand strict obedience and reinforce individual oppression. Debates about community continue to this day, affecting the work of applied sociologists who address disadvantage. Some communities are held up as an ideal and so resources are allocated to groups who appear to conform to policy definitions of a “good community.” Other communities are stigmatised so programs either neglect their needs or focus on their deficiencies rather than their strenghts.

I’ve got a couple of posts and videos on community #work soon. Until then, have a think about how definitions of community might affect #AppliedSociology. For example, I took this photo over the weekend at the #Hispanic Street Festival in #Melbourne #Australia. This event is one of the ways that #multiculturalism officially recognises and supports minority communities- by sponsoring community shows revolving around food and music.  Social welfare, political recognition and other community issues of difference gain less social attention and funding. #visualsociology #society #socialscience #latin High-res

#Sociology of #community: A group who follow a social structure within a society (culture, norms, values, status). They may work together to organise social life within a particular place,
or they may be bound by a sense of belonging sustained across time and space. We start students thinking about community using the work of Ferdinand Toennies. He used the concept of gemienschaft to study the close social ties in rural and pre-industrial societies, where everyone knows one another and bonds overlap. For example your local grocerer is also your neighbour, you socialise together and you may be their children’s teacher. Gesellschaft is the opposite. Toennies used this to describe urban, post-industrial communities where people don’t necessarily know their neighbours and locals have specialised roles. You may not know your grocerer by name or associate outside their shop. Toennies sees the former as an ideal community and the latter as a problem. Durkheim and other sociologists have argued against the idealism of this typology as close-knit communities are more likely to adhere to traditions that demand strict obedience and reinforce individual oppression. Debates about community continue to this day, affecting the work of applied sociologists who address disadvantage. Some communities are held up as an ideal and so resources are allocated to groups who appear to conform to policy definitions of a “good community.” Other communities are stigmatised so programs either neglect their needs or focus on their deficiencies rather than their strenghts.

I’ve got a couple of posts and videos on community #work soon. Until then, have a think about how definitions of community might affect #AppliedSociology. For example, I took this photo over the weekend at the #Hispanic Street Festival in #Melbourne #Australia. This event is one of the ways that #multiculturalism officially recognises and supports minority communities- by sponsoring community shows revolving around food and music. Social welfare, political recognition and other community issues of difference gain less social attention and funding. #visualsociology #society #socialscience #latin