Flowers in the Attic is being remade into a Lifetime movie. Read this interesting interview with V.C. Andrew’s ghostwriter,  Andrew Neiderman, who has written 70 of Andrew’s books since her death. He’s also written 44 books under his own name, including The Devil’s Advocate (later made into a film with Keanu Reeves, Al Pacino and Charlize Theron). He does not approve of the first Flowers in the Attic film but says this one is going to be awesome.

Jean-Louis Barrault, María Casares and Albert Camus looking beyond cool, 1948.
Here’s your salacious historical gossip for the day: Casares was married to actor André Schlesser but she has admitted to having a 16 year affair with Camus who was also married at the time. He was also having affairs with three other women at the when he died in a car crash at age 46. The Guardian writes:

Camus had met Maria Casares, later star of Cocteau’s Orpheus but already an established actress, in 1944. Daughter of a rich Spanish Republican, a refugee from Franco, she was a passionate, wilful, intelligent woman. She was probably the only one of his lovers who had a relationship of equality with him. In addition, Todd says, ‘If he was a Don Juan, she was a Don Juana’….
Far from being a Parisian intellectual with little conscience about his affairs, Camus’ relationships were important to him. ‘He had a much more healthy relationship with women than Sartre,’ [biographer Olivier] Todd says. ‘His relationships were quite moving’….
But you cannot convincingly attach a lugubrious alibi to a personality of such rigorous honesty as Camus: the communist who, unlike Sartre, condemned Stalin’s labour camps when their existence was revealed; and the consumptive journalist who worked in occupied Paris for the clandestine paper, Combat, while the upper-class spokesman for communism, Sartre, led an unmolested life of intellectual and material ease.

Image source: Albert Camus.

Jean-Louis Barrault, María Casares and Albert Camus looking beyond cool, 1948.

Here’s your salacious historical gossip for the day: Casares was married to actor André Schlesser but she has admitted to having a 16 year affair with Camus who was also married at the time. He was also having affairs with three other women at the when he died in a car crash at age 46. The Guardian writes:

Camus had met Maria Casares, later star of Cocteau’s Orpheus but already an established actress, in 1944. Daughter of a rich Spanish Republican, a refugee from Franco, she was a passionate, wilful, intelligent woman. She was probably the only one of his lovers who had a relationship of equality with him. In addition, Todd says, ‘If he was a Don Juan, she was a Don Juana’….

Far from being a Parisian intellectual with little conscience about his affairs, Camus’ relationships were important to him. ‘He had a much more healthy relationship with women than Sartre,’ [biographer Olivier] Todd says. ‘His relationships were quite moving’….

But you cannot convincingly attach a lugubrious alibi to a personality of such rigorous honesty as Camus: the communist who, unlike Sartre, condemned Stalin’s labour camps when their existence was revealed; and the consumptive journalist who worked in occupied Paris for the clandestine paper, Combat, while the upper-class spokesman for communism, Sartre, led an unmolested life of intellectual and material ease.

Image source: Albert Camus.

Before knowing something about Western music, I was trying to just base the lyrics on old Persian poets like Hafiz, Rumi. They were living 700 years ago, 800 years ago… When your approach is formalistic, you only think about reading, not concepts. Conceptually, most of these don’t work for the modern age. That’s why I started to switch their concepts to our age.

Mohsen Namjoo, “Iran’s Rebel Poet,” is based in the USA as he is unable to return and play his music in his native Iran. While on a European tour in 2009, Namjoo was sentenced to five years imprisonment for citing verses of the Koran with music. This is forbidden in Islamic law in Iran. 

This is an interesting interview with SBS News.